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Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 61 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published primarily in the last ten years.  

The MCH Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 61 records.
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Gladden RM, Vivolo-Kantor AM, Hamburger ME, Lumpkin CD. 2014. Bullying surveillance among youths: Uniform definitions for public health and recommended data elements–Version 1.0. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control; Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, 104 pp.

Annotation: This document is designed to help organizations, researchers, evaluators, community groups, educators, and public health officials define and gather systematic data on bullying to better inform research and prevention efforts. Contents include background on the problem including what is currently known about the public health burden of bullying and the need for a uniform definition of bullying, the uniform definition and description of key terms, considerations to keep in mind when gathering data on bullying, and recommended data elements.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Data collection, Injury prevention, Injury surveillance systems, Research

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National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. 2014. The relationship between bullying and suicide: What we know and what it means to schools. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 9 pp.

Annotation: This document provides information to improve schools' understanding of and ability to prevent and respond to bullying- and suicide-related behaviors. Contents include research on bullying and suicide, and what school personnel can do and where they can find more information.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mental health, Bullying, Child mental health, Data linkage, Prevention, Suicide, Youth

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Stopbullying.gov. 2014. Bullying prevention & response base training module. [Washington, DC]: Stopbullying.gov, 109 pp.

Annotation: This bullying prevention training module provides information and resources to help viewers lead bullying prevention efforts in their local communities. The training describes the many forms of bullying; presents best practices and misdirections in bullying prevention and response, and provides case studies to help community facilitators lead effective prevention programs. Group brainstorming and next action steps are also covered in the training module, which can be viewed in English or Spanish as slides or in printable pdf format.

Contact: Stopbullying.gov, 200 Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://www.stopbullying.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Spanish language materials, Bullying, Community participation, Prevention, Training materials

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Hertz MF, ed. 2013. The relationship between youth involvement in bullying and suicide. Journal of Adolescent Health 53(Suppl. 1):S1-S54,

Annotation: This journal supplement explores bullying and suicide among adolescents. Contents include eight articles that convey the complexity of the relationship between bullying (as perpetrators and/or victims) and suicide-related behaviors. Topics include suicidal thinking and behavior among adolescents involved in verbal and social bullying; psychological, physical, and academic correlates of cyberbullying and traditional bullying; inclusive anti-bullying policies and reduced risk of suicide attempts in lesbian and gay adolescents; suicidal ideation and school bullying experiences; potential suicide ideation and its association with observing bullying in school; suicidal adolescents' experiences with bullying perpetration and victimization during high school as risk factors for later depression and suicidal thinking or behavior; acutely suicidal adolescents who engage in bullying behavior; and precipitating circumstances of suicide among adolescents (ages 10-17) by sex.

Contact: Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine, 111 Deer Lake Road, Suite 100, Deerfield, IL 60015, Telephone: (847) 753-5226 Fax: (847) 480-9282 E-mail: sam@adolescenthealth.org Web Site: http://www.adolescenthealth.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Mental health, Policy analysis, Risk factors, School health, Suicide

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Lawner EK, Terzian MA. 2013. What works for bullying programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Bethesda, MD: Child Trends, 9 pp.

Annotation: This report synthesizes findings from experimental evaluations of 17 bullying programs for children and adolescents. Topics include how frequently these programs work to improve the outcomes of physical and verbal bullying, social and relational bullying, bullying victimization, attitudes toward bullying, and being a bystander of bullying.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescents, Attitude change, Behavior modification, Bullying, Children, Community programs, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation

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Masiello MG, Schroeder D. 2013. A public health approach to bullying prevention. Washington, DC: American Public Health Association, 355 pp.

Annotation: This book presents a public health approach to bullying prevention for parents and professionals looking for advice on specific facets of school-based bullying. The book focuses on public health strategies to provide a scientific approach to community planning, the use of evidence-based programs, coalition development, and the ability to change the culture in a school and community to one that is positive and strong. Topics include social and mental health consequences of bullying; practical implications for school administrators; health consequences; creating healthy school climates for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered students; best practices; foundations of coalition building; community engagement; a call to action for schools and legislators; and program sustainability.

Contact: American Public Health Association, 800 I Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001-3710, Telephone: (202) 777-2742 Secondary Telephone: Fax: (202) 777-2534 E-mail: comments@apha.org Web Site: http://www.apha.org $50 (non-members), plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-87553-203-5.

Keywords: Bullying, Community participation, Homosexuality, Mental health, Public health, School linked programs, School safety, Schools, Social factors, Students, Violence prevention

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National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2013. Preventing bullying in schools through partnerships. (Upd. ed.). Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 2 pp. (Promising practices: Women, children, and adolescents)

Annotation: This updated policy brief provides information about the Highmark Foundation bullying-prevention initiative within its Highmark Healthy High 5 project. The brief describes how Highmark worked to help schools in a 49-county area of Pennsylvania implement the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Mental health, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Programs, Public health, Schools, State initiatives

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Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Best practices: Creating an LGBT-inclusive school climate—A teaching tolerance guide for school leaders. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This guide for school leaders provides information about how to create a tolerant environment at school that is inclusive of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender individuals. The guide discusses building an inclusive school climate and preventing and addressing problems (such as bullying and harassment).

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the web site.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Bullying, Homosexuality, Inclusion, Inclusive schools, Prevention, Schools, Sexual harassment, Sexuality, Tolerance

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Teaching Tolerance. 2013. Bullied: A student, a school and a case that made history. [Montgomery, AL]: Teaching Tolerance, 5 pp.

Annotation: This website describes a documentary film geared toward middle school and high school students, administrators, teachers, and counselors that chronicles one student's ordeal at the hands of anti-gay bullies and offers a message of hope for those fighting harassment. The film is intended to help create a safer school environment for all students, help students understand the toll bullying takes on victims, and encourage students to stand up for classmates who are being harassed. The film, which is 40 minutes in length, includes closed captioning and Spanish subtitles. Also included is a viewer's guide with lesson plans and activities that can be used in staff development. Additional related resources are available on the website.

Contact: Teaching Tolerance, c/o Southern Poverty Law Center , 400 Washington Avenue, Montgomery, AL 36104, Telephone: (334) 956-8200 Fax: (334) 956-8488 E-mail: http://www.tolerance.org/contact-us Web Site: http://www.tolerance.org/ Available from the web site.

Keywords: Bullying, Consumer education materials, High schools, Homosexuality, Middle schools, Safety, Sexual harassment, Spanish language materials, Staff development, Tolerance

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Seigle JE, ed. [2012]. The cost benefit of bullying prevention: A first-time analysis of savings. Pittsburgh, PA: Highmark Foundation, 12 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses the costs and benefits of bullying-prevention efforts. The paper, which is an outgrowth of the Highmark's Foundation's bullying initiative, looks at the financial impact that could be anticipated based on the foundation-funded implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, which has been implemented in Pennsylvania schools, over a 3-year period in the 49 Pennsylvania counties it serves. Topics include economics of the program, cost benefit in three impact areas (health conditions related to bullying, treatment rate and costs, and estimated savings if these costs are avoided), cost benefit of the program for schools, societal costs benefits of bullying prevention, and economic implications.

Contact: Highmark Foundation, Fifth Avenue Place, 120 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3099, Telephone: (800) 789-1726 Fax: (412) 544-6120 E-mail: info@highmarkfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.highmark.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Bullying, Child health, Costs, Financing, Mental health, Pennsylvania, Prevention, Programs, Schools, Treatment

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Bully Free World. 2012. Special needs anti-bullying toolkit. New York, NY: Autism Speaks,

Annotation: This toolkit is designed to help parents, teachers, and students deal with bullying directed toward children with special health care needs. The toolkit comprises a set of resources to help users confront bullying from many angles, including talking to children, being aware of one's rights, and teaching tolerance in schools. Resources are divided into separate sections for parents, students, and teachers.

Contact: Autism Speaks, 1 East 33rd Street, Fourth Floor, New York, NY 10016, Telephone: (212) 252-8584 Fax: (212) 252-8676 E-mail: contactus@autismspeaks.org Web Site: http://www.autismspeaks.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents with special health care needs, Bullying, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Human rights, Parent child relations, Prevention, Resource materials, School age children, Schools

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National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation. 2012. Creating safer schools and healthier children: A model bullying prevention program. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1 video (90 min.).

Annotation: This webinar shares how the Highmark Foundation and its coalition of leaders in bullying prevention enabled implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in 240 schools across the Foundation's Pennsylvania service region. Topics include the impact of the Pennsylvania Bullying Prevention Coalition, a cost benefit analysis of bullying prevention, and insights related to program replication. Resources available from the webcast site include the meeting agenda, speaker biographies, presentations, and additional resources. An evaluation survey and an archive of the webinar are also available.

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bullying, Case studies, Model programs, Pennsylvania, Prevention programs, School age children

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U.S. Government Accountability Office. 2012. School bullying: Extent of legal protections for vulnerable groups needs to be more fully assessed. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 58 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses what is known about the prevalence of school bullying and its effects on victims, approaches that selected states and local school districts are taking to combat school bullying, legal options that federal and selected state governments have in place when bullying leads to allegations of discrimination, and key federal agencies' coordination efforts to combat school bullying. Background, methodology, and findings are included.

Contact: U.S. Government Accountability Office, 441 G Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20548, Telephone: (202) 512-3000 Secondary Telephone: E-mail: contact@gao.gov Web Site: http://www.gao.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Discrimination, Elementary schools, High schools, Junior high school, Legal issues, Legal processes, Middle schools, Prevention, Research, School age children, School districts, Schools, Service coordination, Statistical data

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U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2012. Moving from awareness to action in bullying prevention: Resources for the field. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webinar, held on December 5, 2012, as part of the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Webinar Series, explores how local communities can activate partnerships to create positive change in bullying prevention. The webinar provided an overview of HRSA’s Bullying Prevention Training Module and Community Action Toolkit, a train-the-trainer resource for elected officials, faith leaders, youth leaders, and leaders of the local business community, as well as professionals in education, health and safety, law enforcement, child care and out-of-school care, mental health and social services, and local recreation offices.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 18-05, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (800) 311-BABY (311-2229) Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community-based services, Federal initiatives, Multimedia, Prevention programs, Resources for professionals, Training materials

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Grantmakers in Health. 2011. Paying (overdue) attention to bullying prevention. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief provides an overview of child and adolescent bullying in the United States and describes some of the prevention and intervention programs that have been identified as effective. The brief describes characteristics that are common among those who are bullied; provides statistics that highlight the scope of the problem; discusses the various types of bullying (including cyberbullying); and addresses the negative consequences. The brief also describes efforts taking place at the federal level -- including the White House conference on bullying prevention hosted in March 2011 in partnership with the U.S. Department of Education and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services -- as well as prevention programs taking place at the state and local levels. Bullying prevention programs in the states of Colorado and Pennsylvania are highlighted.

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Community programs, Injury prevention, Intervention, Prevention programs, Violence prevention

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Hamburger ME, Basile KC, Vivolo AM. 2011. Measuring bullying victimization, perpetration, and bystander experiences: A compendium of assessment tools. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 119 pp.

Annotation: This compendium of assessment tools provides researchers, prevention specialists, and health educators with tools to measure a range of bullying experiences: bully perpetration, bully victimization, bully-victim experiences, and bystander experiences. The compendium provides 33 measures for assessing self-reported incidence and prevalence of a variety of bullying experiences. The compendium includes measures of bully perpetration only; bully victimization only; being both a bully and a victim; and being a bully, a bystander (observer), and/or a victim of bullying situations. Each section begins with a table summarizing important information about each of the measures in the section. For each measure, the compendium provides measure items, response categories, scoring instructions, and the information provided to respondents at the beginning of the measure, when available.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Assessment, Bullying, Children, Measures, Prevention

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Land KC. 2011. The 2011 FCD-CWI special focus report on trends in violent bullying victimization in school contexts for 8th, 10th, and 12th graders, 1991-2009. Durham, NC: Foundation for Child Development and the Child and Youth Well-Being Index (FCD-CWI) Project at Duke University, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report addresses questions about whether the recent upsurge in school bullying in the United States is historically unique in recent American history and about the relative risk of bully victimization in students with different sociodemographic, contextual, and behavioral characteristics and the variation of these risks over time. The report also addresses questions about the effects of anti-bullying efforts. The report analyzes trends and changes in the prevalence of serious forms (physically threatening, violent, injurious) of school bullying victimization among middle school and high school students over time and in differential exposure of demographic, social, and economic groups to school bullying.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child behavior, Economic factors, High school students, Middle school students, Prevention, Research, School violence, Trends, Victims, Violence

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National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention. 2011. Bullying prevention state laws. Washington, DC: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on bullying prevention legislation. Topics include historic and current views of state legislation, elements of a bullying prevention plan, the school's legal responsibility, bullying as a civil rights issue, steps that secondary schools/high schools sites should take.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Legal responsibility, Schools, State legislation, Violence prevention

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Seeley K, Tombari ML, Bennett LJ, Dunkle JB. 2011. Bullying in schools: An overview. Washington, DC: Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 10 pp. (Juvenile justice bulletin)

Annotation: This bulletin provides an overview of findings from a series of studies conducted by the National Center for School Engagement to explore the connections between bullying in schools, school attendance and engagement, and academic achievement. The bulletin highlights key findings, examines the implications of the studies, and makes recommendations for anti-bullying programs in the United States. A personal account from a woman who survived being bullied in middle- and high-school illustrates the concepts discussed in the bulletin.

Contact: National Criminal Justice Reference Service, P.O. Box 6000, Rockville, MD 20849-6000, Telephone: (301) 519-5500 Secondary Telephone: (800) 851-3420 Fax: (301) 519-5212 E-mail: askncjrs@ncjrs.org Web Site: https://www.ncjrs.gov Available from the website. Document Number: NCJ 234205.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Bullying, Mental health, Prevention programs, School health, Studies

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Stein ND, Mennemeier KA. 2011. Addressing the gendered dimensions of harassment and bullying: What domestic and sexual violence advocates need to know. Harrisburg, PA: National Resource Center on Domestic Violence; Enola, PA: National Sexual Violence Resource Center, 17 pp. (Critical issue brief)

Annotation: This paper discusses the distinctions between bullying and harassment and the priorities and responsibilities of school districts. Topics include the unintended consequences of ignoring the gendered dimensions of bullying and harassment in K-12 schools and strategies for collaborating with school personnel and students.

Contact: National Online Resource Center on Violence Against Women, National Resource Center on Domestic Violence, 3605 Vartan Way, Suite 101, Harrisburg, PA 17110, Telephone: (800) 537-2238 Secondary Telephone: (800) 553.2508 Fax: (717) 545-9456 Web Site: http://www.vawnet.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Gender discrimination, Legal responsibility, Policy analysis, Schools, Sexual harassment, Violence prevention

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Stuart-Cassel V, Bell A, Springer JF. 2011. Analysis of state bullying laws and policies. Rockville, MD: Westat, 182 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes current approaches to address bullying in the 46 states with anti-bullying laws and the 41 states that have created anti-bullying policies as models for schools. The report shows the prevalence of state efforts to combat bullying over the last several years and looks at legislation enacted between 1999 and 2010 to introduce or amend statues that address bullying and related behaviors in schools. The report also examines the extent to which states' bullying laws and policies contain the common key components of state anti-bulling laws identified in the December 2011 guidance document compiled by the U.S. Department of Education titled Anti-Bullying Policies: Examples of Provisions in State Laws. The appendices include state-by-state comparisons of anti-bulling legislation, policy, and definitions of bullying and cyber-bullying,

Contact: U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20202, Telephone: (800) 872-5327 Secondary Telephone: (800) 437-0833 Web Site: http://www.ed.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Comparative analysis, Models, Policy, Prevention, School linked programs, State legislation, Studies

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Suicide Prevention Resource Center. 2011. Suicide and bullying. Newton, MA: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, 8 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief examines the relationship between suicide and bullying among children and adolescents, with special attention to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth. It also explores strategies for suicide and bullying prevention.

Contact: Suicide Prevention Resource Center, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453-8313, Telephone: (877) 438-7772 Secondary Telephone: (617) 964-5448 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: info@sprc.org Web Site: http://www.sprc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Homosexuality, Suicide, Suicide prevention

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U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education, and U.S. Department of Justice. 2011. White House Conference on Bullying Prevention. [Washington, DC]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Department of Education, and U.S. Department of Justice,

Annotation: This website provides information about bullying and how to prevent it. The materials available on the site offer guidance on how communities can work together to prevent bullying and discuss risk factors for bullying; effective bullying- and violence-prevention programs; reduction of bullying against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adolescents, and cyberbullying. Different sections of the site are geared toward children, adolescents, young adults, parents, educators, and communities.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, Telephone: (202) 619-0257 Secondary Telephone: (877) 696-6775 Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Communities, Consumer education materials, High risk groups, Prevention, Violence, Young adults

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U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Training and Technical Assistance Center. 2011. Bullying intervention: What works. Washington, DC: U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, National Training and Technical Assistance Center,

Annotation: In this webcast, three bullying-prevention and -intervention experts provide guidance on what bullying is and discuss challenges in defining and identifying bullying behaviors. Presenters highight key findings from research on the prevalence of bullying and the varied roles that children and adolescents can play in bullying situations. Presenters also discuss actions that children and adolescents believe may be helpful in addressing bullying and best-practice strategies to communicate with adolescents who bully, are bullied, or witness bullying.

Contact: U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Department of Justice, 810 Seventh Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20531, Telephone: (202) 307-5911 Secondary Telephone: (202) 307-8656 Fax: (202) 307-2093 E-mail: michele.dekonty@usdoj.edu Web Site: http://www.ojjdp.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Intervention, Prevention, Research

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National Conference of State Legislatures. [2010]. Cyberbullying. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures,

Annotation: This resource lists state legislation enacted 2006-2010 that addresses cyberbullying including links to full bill text. A definition of cyberbullying and additional resources are included.

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Prevention, Public policy, State legislation

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Highmark Foundation. 2010 (ca.). Highmark Healthy High 5: A five-year initiative report. Pittsburgh, PA: Highmark Foundation, 36 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about Highmark Healthy High 5, an initiative with five focus areas (nutrition, physical activity, bullying prevention, self-esteem, and grieving) that works to improve the health of children and adolescents by providing them and those around them with tools and practices for healthy behavior. In addition to discussing these focus areas, the report discusses program highlights and lessons learned and provides additional resources. The initiative provided funding for programs in a 49-county area of Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Contact: Highmark Foundation, Fifth Avenue Place, 120 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15222-3099, Telephone: (800) 789-1726 Fax: (412) 544-6120 E-mail: info@highmarkfoundation.org Web Site: http://www.highmark.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Adolescent health, Bullying, Families, Health promotion, Nutrition, Physical activity, Prevention, Self esteem, State initiatives, Child health

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Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, National Association of City and County Health Officials, and Safe States Alliance. 2010. Policies to prevent bullying in schools. [Atlanta, GA: Safe States,

Annotation: This webcast features presentations by professionals and advocates who are actively involved in shaping policy to prevent bullying. Speakers discuss their experiences with anti-bullying legislation (including legislation related to cyberbullying), describe the process needed to get such policies enacted, and provide insights on how state and local public health professionals can get more involved in the development and implementation of these policies.

Contact: Safe States Alliance, 2200 Century Parkway , Atlanta, GA 30341, Telephone: (770) 690-9000 Fax: (770) 690-8996 E-mail: info@safestates.org Web Site: http://www.stipda.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Legislation, Policy development, Prevention, Public health, School health

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Hinduja S, Patchin JW. 2010. State cyberbullying laws: A brief review of cyberbullying laws and policies across America. [no place]: Cyberbullying Research Center, 11 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides a brief review of state cyberbullying laws and policies. Topic include whether the state has an existing law, updates or laws proposed, and whether the laws have provisions for cyberbullying, electronic harassment, criminal or school sanctions, or require school policy.

Contact: Cyberbullying Research Center, Florida Atlantic University, School of Criminology and Criminal Justice, 5353 Parkside Drive, Jupiter, FL 33458-2906, Telephone: (561) 799-8227 E-mail: hinduja@cyberbullying.us Web Site: http://www.cyberbullying.us/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Public policy, State legislation

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Kosciw JG. 2010. The 2009 national school climate survey: The school-related experiences of our nation's lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth. New York, NY: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 139 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the National School Climate Survey conducted by the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network. The survey asked lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth about biased language in their schools; feelings of comfort and safety in school; and experiences of verbal, physical, and sexual harassment based on sexual orientation, gender, gender expression, race/ethnicity, disability, and religion. The report, which includes an executive summary, also contains a description of the study's methodology, results, and a conclusion. Extensive statistical information is presented in figures and tables throughout the report.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent sexuality, Adolescents, Ethnic factors, Gender discrimination, Homosexuality, Language, Racial factors, Religion, Safety, Schools, Sexual harassment, Surveys

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National Conference of State Legislatures. 2010. How states are addressing bullying: From the schoolyard to cyberspace. Denver, CO: National Conference of State Legislatures,

Annotation: This webinar focuses on state efforts to prevent bullying. It features a conversation with Assistant Deputy Secretary Kevin Jennings from the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools, who shares his vision for addressing bullying in schools. He provides an overview of the problem and discusses legislative efforts and policy aimed at preventing it. The webinar includes representatives from states who share their own experiences in efforts to form effective policies that address various forms of bullying, including cyberbullying. The webinar is co-sponsored by National Council of State Legislator's (NCSL) Legislative Education Staff Network (LESN) and the Legislative Health Staff Network (LHSN).

Contact: National Conference of State Legislatures, 7700 East First Place, Denver, CO 80230, Telephone: (303) 364-7700 Fax: (303) 364-7800 Web Site: http://www.ncsl.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Multimedia, Policy development, Public policy, School safety, State initiatives, Violence prevention

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National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation, Children's Safety Network. 2010. Bullying prevention: Strategies to support statewide collaboration. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation,

Annotation: This webinar brought together public and private sector stakeholders to share outcomes and lessons learned from the Highmark Healthy High 5 Bullying Prevention Institute, which has implemented the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program in schools across Pennsylvania. Topics include strategies to implement the population-wide public health initiative to spur national behavior and culture change and ultimately prevent school-based bullying across the United States. The webinar archive (presentation slides with audio) and additional resources are available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Bullying, Conference proceedings, Prevention programs, School health programs, Sociocultural factors, Strategic planning, Violence prevention

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Clemson University, Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life. 2009. OLWEUS Bullying Prevention Program. Clemson, SC: Clemson University, Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life,

Annotation: This Web site presents information about the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, a comprehensive, schoolwide program designed for use in elementary, middle, or junior high schools. Its goals are to reduce and prevent bullying problems among schoolchildren and to improve peer relations at school. The site provides information about elements of the program, program history, fact sheets about the program, evidence of effectiveness, training information, suggested program timeline, program materials, and costs.

Contact: Clemson University, Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life, 158 Poole Agricultural Center, Clemson, SC 29634-0132, Telephone: (864) 656-6271 Fax: (864) 656-6281 E-mail: Lydia@clemson.edu Web Site: http://www.clemson.edu/ifnl Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child behavior, Costs, Elementary schools, Junior high schools, Middle schools, Peer groups, Prevention, Programs, Training

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National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Safe Schools/Healthy Students. 2009. Preventing cyberbullying in schools and the community. Newton, MA: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, 6 pp.

Annotation: This paper offers information about how to prevent cyberbullying in schools and in the community. The paper provides information on what bullying and cyberbullying are, and their consequences; the differences between cyberbullying and other bullying; facts about cyberbullying; and what schools and parents can do.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child attitudes, Child behavior, Communities, Parents, Prevention, Schools, World Wide Web

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Ragozzino K, O'Brien MU. 2009. Social and emotional learning and bullying prevention. Newton, MA: Education Development Center, 21 pp.

Annotation: This information brief (1) provides a basic description of a school-wide social and emotional learning (SEL) framework; (2) illustrates the relationship between social and emotional factors and bullying, and (3) explains how an SEL framework can be extended to include bullying prevention. The brief provides a list of criteria that distinguishes bullying from other occurrences of misbehavior or aggression; discusses the prevalence and consequences of bullying; and places bullying within the broader context of social and emotional development within a school setting. Research findings, guidelines on applying a school-wide SEL framework that addresses bullying, and a list of selected resources are provided.

Contact: National Center for Mental Health Promotion and Youth Violence Prevention, Education Development Center, 43 Foundry Avenue, Waltham, MA 02453, Telephone: (877) 217-3595 Fax: (617) 969-5951 E-mail: info@promoteprevent.org Web Site: http://www.promoteprevent.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Child mental health, Emotional development, Prevention programs, Program improvement, School linked programs, Social learning, Violence prevention

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Sampson R. 2009. Bullying in schools. Washington, DC: Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice, 48 pp. (Problem-oriented guides for police, problem-specific guides series, no. 12)

Annotation: This monograph summarizes knowledge gained from past studies in the U.S. and other western countries about the extent and nature of the problem of bullying in schools, methods for analyzing local problems, and how police can reduce school bullying and the harm caused by it. Appendices contain a summary of responses or interventions to reduce school bullying and a sample brochure that educates parents about school bullying.

Contact: U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, 1100 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20530, Telephone: (800) 421-6770 E-mail: askCopsRC@usdoj.gov Web Site: http://www.cops.usdoj.gov Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 1-932582-11-8.

Keywords: Bullying, Law enforcement, School linked programs, School safety, School violence

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Seeley K, Tombari ML, Bennett LJ, Dunkle JB. 2009. Peer victimization in schools: A set of quantitative and qualitative studies of the connections among peer victimization, school engagement, truancy, school achievement, and other outcomes. Denver, CO: National Center for School Engagement, 290 pp. (exec. summ. 13 pp.).

Annotation: This report presents findings from three studies that explored the connections among the variables of bullying/peer victimization, school engagement and the school outcomes of attendance and achievement. It includes (1) a review and critical analysis of the literature, (2) a quantitative study of the connection between students being truant, and their experiencing victimization or bullying from their peers in school; and (3) a qualitative study of some young adults who overcame bullying and some who did not. The report also explores teachers' views on bullying, discusses the implications of the studies, and provides recommendations.

Contact: National Center for School Engagement, Partnership for Families & Children, 450 Lincoln Street, Suite 100, Denver, CO 80203, Telephone: (303) 837-8466 x101 E-mail: info@schoolengagement.org Web Site: http://www.schoolengagement.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Bullying, Literature reviews, School attendance, School role, Studies, Victims

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Sidorowicz K, Hair EC, Milot A. 2009. Assessing bullying: A guide for out-of-school time program practitioners. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 6 pp. (Research-to-results brief)

Annotation: This brief focuses on bullying during childhood and adolescence and provides guidelines for out-of-school-time program staff on how to identify bullying and to promote positive conflict resolution techniques. The brief describes types of bullying; discusses how common it is and who is most likely to be a bully, a victim, or both; explains how to differentiate bullying from other conflict situations; and discusses what programs can do. An assessment for bullying is included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child behavior, Conflict resolution, Mental health, Psychological development

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2009. Project ACHIEVE. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 9 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes Project ACHIEVE, a school effectiveness program for preschool, elementary, and middle schools (students 3 to 14 years old) that is designed to help schools, communities, and families develop, strengthen, and solidify their youth's resilience, protective factors, and self-management skills. The program is included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's model programs database. The fact sheet lists protective and risk factors addressed, target population, evaluation design and outcomes, benefits, how it works, implementation essentials, references and contact information. Links are provided to the program's training schedule and program fidelity.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community programs, Elementary schools, Kindergarten, Middle schools, Psychosocial development, School age children, School safety

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2009. Teaching students to be peacemakers. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 9 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Teaching Students to be Peacemakers program for grades kindergarten through 9, which teaches conflict resolution procedures and skills to students, faculty, and staff members in schools. The program is included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's model programs database. The fact sheet lists protective and risk factors addressed, target population, evaluation design and outcomes, how it works, references and contact information. Links are provided to the program's training schedule and program fidelity.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community programs, Conflict resolution, Elementary schools, Middle schools, Psychosocial development, School age children, School safety

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Hertz MF, David-Ferdon C. 2008. Electronic media and youth violence: A CDC issue brief for educators and caregivers. Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, 19 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief, which was developed for educators and caregivers, summarizes what is known about young people and electronic aggression (i.e., behaving aggressively in an electronic environment). The brief summarizes a presentation of an expert panel held in Atlanta, Georgia, on September 20-21, 2006, titled Electronic Media and Youth Violence. The brief discusses who is at risk, what is the relationship between victims and perpetrators of electronic aggression, what problems are associated with being a victim of electronic aggression, what are the profiles associated with being a perpetrator of electronic aggression, whether electronic agression is a extension of bullying, and what can be done and next steps.

Contact: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, N.E., Mailstop F-63, Atlanta, GA 30341-3717, Telephone: (800) CDC-INFO Secondary Telephone: (888) 232-6348 Fax: (770) 488-4760 E-mail: cdcinfo@cdc.gov Web Site: http://www.cdc.gov/injury/index.html Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Agression, Bullying, Electronic mail, High risk groups, Victims, Violence

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Safe Schools Coalition. 2008. Bullying, harassment, school-based violence. Seattle, WA: Safe Schools Coalition,

Annotation: This resource guide lists materials available on the Internet that address antigay harassment and bullying, both antigay and in general, in schools. Some of the resources are from U.S. state agencies and others are specific to the United Kingdom.

Contact: Safe Schools Coalition, 1002 East Seneca , Seattle, WA 98122-4203, Telephone: (206) 957-1621 Secondary Telephone: (866) 430-6631 Fax: (206) 325-2689 E-mail: questions@safeschoolscoalition.org Web Site: http://www.safeschoolscoalition.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Bullying, Homosexuality, School violence

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Children's Safety Network National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center. 2007. Bullying prevention: Examples of health department activities. Newton, MA: National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center, Children's Safety Network, 17 pp.

Annotation: This document describes efforts of health departments in 16 states and 1 territory to address bullying prevention. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network , Education Development Center, 55 Chapel Street, Newton, MA 02458, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csn@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Interpersonal violence, Program descriptions , State initiatives, Violence prevention

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Children's Safety Network National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center. 2007. Preventing bullying: The role of public health and safety professionals. Newton, MA: National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center, Children's Safety Network , 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the federal Stop Bullying Now program and its Web site offering information and resources to help children, parents, and professionals address and prevent bullying. Topics include a definition of bullying, children who bully and children who are bullied, consequences of bullying, how to prevent bullying, and what can maternal and child health and other public health and safety practitioners do to help prevent bullying. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Children's Safety Network , Education Development Center, 55 Chapel Street, Newton, MA 02458, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csn@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Interpersonal violence, Parent support services, Resources for professionals, School age children, Violence prevention

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Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network. 2007. Gay-straight alliances: Creating safer schools for LGBT students and their allies. New York, NY: Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network, 4 pp. (GLSEN research brief)

Annotation: This brief discusses how gay-straight alliances (GSAs) help make schools safer for all students and likely play an integral role in mitigating the negative impact of bullying and harassment on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) students. Topics include how alliances send a message that biased language and harassment will not be tolerated on campus, how having a GSA may make schools more accessible to LGBT students and contribute to a more positive school environment, how GSAs may help LGBT student identify supportive school staff which has been shown to have a positive impact on their academic achievement and experiences in school, and how most students lack access to GSAs or other student clubs that provide support and address issues to LGBT students and their allies.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Homosexuality, School violence, Violence prevention

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Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network. 2007. Model state anti-bullying and anti-harassment legislation: Model language, commentary and references. New York, NY: Gay, Lesbian, and Straight Education Network, 5 pp.

Annotation: This document explains the purpose and intent of the model state anti-bullying and anti-harassment legislation so language can be tailored to meet the specific needs of a state, while keeping the intent of the legislation intact. Contents include legislative purpose and findings, definitions and scope of proscribed conduct, an overview of state department of education responsibilities and district responsibilities, sanctions and liability, retaliation, and training and prevention programs. Additional information is provided on severability.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Homosexuality, Model legislation, School violence, State legislation, Violence prevention

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Kohm A, Little M, Rich L. 2006. What do bystanders do when children are being bullied ... and why do they do it?. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago, 5 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief draws on study findings to build understanding of children's behavior when they witness bullying and the reasons why children defend victims, join in the bullying, or avoid involvement. Topics include children's individual attitudes, group norms, social dilemma, as well as future directions for research and practice. Extensive references conclude the brief.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Adolescents, Attitudes, Bullying, Child behavior, Children, Research, School violence, Social factors, Violence

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Mental Health America. 2006. Factsheet: Bullying and gay youth. Alexandria, VA: Mental Health America, 5 pp.

Annotation: This electronic resource provides information on bullying actions that target gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender youth and the affect on their mental health and education. Advice and resources are provided for mental health, school counseling, human rights, advocacy, and for families and friends of lesbians and gays.

Contact: Mental Health America, 2000 North Beauregard Street, Sixth Floor , Alexandria, VA 22311, Telephone: (703) 684-7722 Secondary Telephone: (800) 969-6MHA Fax: (703) 684-5968 Web Site: http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, High schools, Homosexuality, Mental health, Middle schools, Resources for professionals, School counseling, Students, Violence prevention

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Stopbullying.gov. [2005]. Roles for health and safety professionals in bullying prevention and intervention. [Washington, DC]: Stopbullying.gov, 3 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about bullying and about how health and safety professionals can help prevent it. The fact sheet explains what bullying is and discusses its effects, risk factors for for bullying and for being bullied, commitments by professional associations and alliances to help prevent bullying, and new roles in prevention.

Contact: Stopbullying.gov, 200 Independence Avenue, Washington, DC 20201, Web Site: http://www.stopbullying.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent behavior, Bullying, Child behavior, Communication, Communities, Early intervention, Education, Family support services, Prevention, Programs, Public policy, Risk factors, Safety, School health, Screening, Training, Treatment

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2004?. Child development project (CDP). Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Child Development Project (CDP), a multifaceted, school wide improvement program that helps elementary schools become caring communities of learners for their students (5 to 12 years old). It promotes school bonding, students' interpersonal skills and commitment to positive values, and a classroom and school-wide climate of safety, respect, caring, and helpfulness. The program is included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's model programs database. The fact sheet lists protective and risk factors addressed, target population, evaluation design and outcomes, how it works, references and contact information. Links are provided to the program's training schedule and program fidelity.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community programs, Elementary schools, Psychosocial development, School age children, School safety

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2004?. Olweus bullying prevention. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Olweus bullying prevention program, a multilevel, multicomponent school-based program designed to prevent or reduce bullying in elementary, middle, and junior high schools ( students 6 to 15 years). The program attempts to restructure the existing school environment to reduce opportunities and rewards for bullying. The program is included in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's model programs database. The fact sheet lists risk factors addressed, target population, evaluation design and outcomes, benefits, how it works, implementation essentials, references and contact information. Links are provided to the program's training schedule and program fidelity.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Community programs, Psychosocial development, School age children, School safety

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2004?. Parenting wisely. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet describes the Parenting Wisely intervention, a self-administered, multimedia CD-ROM program designed to reduce family conflict and child behavior problems by improving parenting skills and enhancing family communication and mutual support, supervision, and discipline. The program, which targets parents with children ages 9-18, has been designated an Exemplary Model Program by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. Program details are presented under the following categories: brief background, recognition, Institute of Medicine classification, intervention type, content focus, protective factors, risk factors, inteventions by domain, key program approaches, outcomes, evaluation design, delivery specifications, intended setting, fidelity, barriers and problems, personnel, education, personnel training, cost, intended age group, intended population, gender focus, replication information, and contact information.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Model programs, Parenting, Psychosocial development, School age children, Substance abuse prevention

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Center for Mental Health in Schools. 2004. Bullying prevention. Los Angeles, CA: Center for Mental Health in Schools, 4 pp. (Quick training aids)

Annotation: This quick training aid offers a brief set of resources to guide those providing an inservice training session on bullying. It is an Internet page with links to the resources cited. Sections include: (1) brief overviews of the topic, (2) fact sheets, (3) sample surveys that can be used to assess the frequency and nature of bullying in the school, (4) model programs and additional resources, and (5) two documents that can be copied to overhead transparencies to assist in presenting this material.

Contact: Center for Mental Health in Schools, UCLA School Mental Health Project, Box 951563, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1563, Telephone: (310) 825-3634 Secondary Telephone: (866) 846-4843 Fax: (310) 206-8716 E-mail: smhp@ucla.edu Web Site: http://smhp.psych.ucla.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Prevention, Training materials

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Children's Safety Network National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center. 2004. Preventing bullying: The role of the public health professional. Newton, MA: Children's Safety Network National Injury and Violence Prevention Resource Center, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet focuses on public health professionals' role in preventing bullying. The fact sheet begins with an overview of the bullying problem and a description of the Children's Safety Network. Children's Safety Network staff served on the steering committee on the Maternal and Child Health Bureau's National Bullying Prevention Campaign and co-chaired the Health and Safety Organization Implementation Working Group. The fact sheet defines bullying and discusses the following issues: perpetrators and the victims, consequences, whether bullying can be prevented, and what can be done. The fact sheet also contains a list of resources for more information and a references list.

Contact: Children's Safety Network , Education Development Center, 55 Chapel Street, Newton, MA 02458, Telephone: (617) 618-2918 Fax: (617) 969-9186 E-mail: csn@edc.org Web Site: http://www.childrenssafetynetwork.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Campaigns, Health personnel, Offenders, Prevention, Public health, Victims

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Committee for Children. 2004. Steps to Respect: A bullying prevention program. Seattle, WA: Committee for Children, var. pag.

Annotation: This set of Internet pages describes the Steps to Respect program, a schoolwide curriculum that trains adults to deal effectively with bullying while teaching skills to help children develop healthy relationships and decrease bullying behavior. The pages include success stories, case studies and the research foundations for the program.

Contact: Committee for Children, 2815 Second Avenue, Suite 400, Seattle, WA 98121, Telephone: (800) 634-4449, ext. 6223 Secondary Telephone: (206) 343-1223, ext. 6223 Fax: (206) 438-6765 E-mail: clientsupport@cfchildren.org Web Site: http://www.cfchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Community programs, Curricula, Prevention programs, School violence

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No Name-calling Week Coalition. 2004. Organizing a No Name-calling Week in your school. New York, NY: No Name-calling Week Coalition,

Annotation: This site provides tips for involving schools and communities in planning a fun and effective No Name Calling Week. The No Name Calling Week project seeks to focus attention on the problem of name calling in schools and to provide students and educators with the tools and inspiration to launch an ongoing dialogue about ways to eliminate name calling in their communities. The fact sheet discusses how to get administrative support and how to get everyone involved. It also describes the roles of guidance staff, support staff, library staff, physical education staff, and families, and it explains how to prepare for the event. Materials to support the campaign, including a video, lesson plans, resource lists, posters, stickers, and other items, are available.

Contact: Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network, 90 Broad Street, Second Floor, New York, NY 10004, Telephone: (212) 727-0135 Fax: (212) 727-0254 E-mail: glsen@glsen.org Web Site: http://www.glsen.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Campaigns, Children, Communities, Families, School role, Teachers

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O'Shaughnessy M, Russell S, Heck K, Calhoun C, Laub C. 2004. Safe place to learn: Consequences of harassment based on actual or perceived sexual orientation and gender non-conformity and steps for making school safer. San Francisco, CA: California Safe Schools Coalition; Davis, CA: 4-H Center for Youth Development, 32 pp.

Annotation: This paper discusses harassment and bullying based on sexual orientation in California schools and documents that schools can take concrete steps to reduce harassment and improve student health and safety. The paper analyzes data from the California Healthy Kids Survey (a broad-based state survey) and an independent companion survey conducted by the California Safe Schools Coalition measuring the effectiveness of school anti-harassment practices. The paper, which includes an executive summary, discusses the major findings from the surveys and offers conclusions and recommendations. Four appendices include the methodology and questions for future research, information about related research, text of the 2003 Preventing School Harassment Survey with frequencies, and text of the question on bias-related harassment from the 2001-2002 California Healthy Kids Survey. Statistical information is presented in tables and figures throughout the paper. The paper also includes a copy of the Safe Place to Learn fact sheet.

Contact: California Safe Schools Coalition, Hamm's Building, 1550 Bryant Street, Suite 800, San Francisco, CA 94103, Telephone: (415) 626-1680 Fax: (415) 626-1683 E-mail: info@casafeschools.org Web Site: http://www.casafeschools.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Adolescents, California, Child health, Children, Data, Safety, Schools, Sexual harassment, Sexual identity, Students, Surveys

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U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 2004. The ABCs of bullying: Addressing, blocking, and curbing school aggression. Rockville, MD: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention,

Annotation: This course, for professionals, examines the causes and effects of bullying, prevention techniques and programs, screening, treatment options, and legal/ethical issues surrounding bullying. The information is relevant to educators, health and mental health practitioners, parents, and anyone else who works with children. Modules include (1) what school bullying is and why it hurts, (2) the role of bullies, victims, and witnesses, (3) factors contributing to bullying and violence, (4) screening and assessment, (5) treatment for children and adolescents, (6) prevention and intervention, and (7) legal and ethical issues. The course also includes supplements, case studies, fact sheets, references, and resources.

Contact: U.S. Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Room 4-1057, 1 Choke Cherry Road, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (240) 276-2420 E-mail: Web Site: http://beta.samhsa.gov/about-us/who-we-are/offices-centers/csap Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Prevention programs, Resource materials, School violence, Training materials

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National Education Association. Bully free: It starts with me. Washington, DC: National Education Association,

Annotation: This website presents resources from the National Education Association's (NEA's) campaign against bullying. Contents include a pledge form for parents and other caring adults willing to advocate for measures to stop bullying in their schools and communities. Additional content includes research and tools, tip sheets and stories, NEA's position and actions, prevention and intervention training, multimedia, and resources for education support professionals.

Contact: National Education Association, 1201 16th Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036-3290, Telephone: (202) 833-4000 Fax: (202) 822-7974 Web Site: http://www.nea.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Primary prevention, Public awareness campaigns, Public service announcements, School age children, School health, Training materials

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PACER Center. National Center for Bullying Prevention. Bloomington, MN: PACER Center,

Annotation: This Web site provides information on the prevention of bullying for elementary, middle and high school students, their parents, and their teachers. The Web site includes contests for students, a lesson plan to be used in elementary schools which includes animated cartoons, games and other material; handouts; materials that can be purchased, including a curriculum for parents of children with disabilities; and information on the Bullying Prevention Awareness Week. Some of the information is available in Spanish and Somali.

Contact: PACER Center , 8161 Normandale Boulevard, Bloomington, MN 55437-1044, Telephone: (952) 838-9000 Secondary Telephone: (952) 838-0190 Fax: (952) 838-0199 Web Site: http://www.pacer.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Elementary schools, High schools, Materials for children, Middle schools, Non English language materials, Public awareness materials, School age children, Spanish language materials, Violence prevention, World Wide Web

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U.S. Department of Education, Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools and Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, University of Colorado at Boulder. The school bully in cyberspace. The Challenge 16(1):1-8. 2009,

Annotation: This newsletter issue discusses bullying in the digital age, what schools can do about cyber bullying, how lawmakers help educators confront cyber bullying, and news from the Office of Safe and Drug-Free Schools (OSDFS) and from the general field.

Contact: Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado at Boulder, 1440 15th Street, Boulder, CO 80302, Telephone: (303) 492-1032 Fax: (303) 443-3297 E-mail: cspv@colorado.edu Web Site: http://www.colorado.edu/cspv Available from the website.

Keywords: Bullying, Internet, School age children, School safety, Social behavior, Telecommunication devices

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U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. StopBullying.gov. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration,

Annotation: This website provides information from various government agencies on what bullying is, what cyberbullying is, who is at risk, and how to prevent and respond to bullying. Contents include a blog, newsroom, videos, policies and laws, and other resources. A section of the website is devoted to content for children and adolescents. The site is also available in Spanish.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Bullying, Children, Community action, Families, Federal initiatives, Parents, Primary prevention, Schools, Spanish language materials

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