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Bibliography of Materials from MCHLine®

This bibliography of 183 items is drawn from MCHLine®, the MCH Library online catalog. It includes selected materials published in the last ten years that discuss home visiting or resource mothers mentoring programs that support pregnant women and parents.

The MCH Library focuses on publications from federal and state agencies, from grantees of federal and state agencies, and from professional and voluntary organizations. It contains unique materials on the history of maternal and child health in the United States, policy papers, reports, conference proceedings, manuals, survey instruments, guidelines, and curricula. The library does not collect materials on clinical medicine. Consumer health materials and commercially published materials are collected very selectively.

Displaying 183 records.
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WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies. n.d.. Home visiting the PITC way. Sausalito, CA: WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure provides information about a home visiting training program conducted by the West Ed institute that combines social work best practices with the latest information on early childhood development and parenting. The brochure discusses what takes place on each day of the 5-day program, explains how to register and what fees cover, and describes the goals and format of the institute.

Contact: WestEd Center for Child and Family Studies, 180 Harbor Drive, Suite 112, Sausalito, CA 94965, Telephone: (415) 289-2300 Web Site: http://www.wested.org/program/center-for-child-family-studies

Keywords: Early childhood development, Home visiting, Infants, Parenting skills, Social work, Training, Young children

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Burwick A, Zaveri H, Shang L, Boller K, Daro D, Strong DA. 2014. Costs of early childhood home visiting: An analysis of programs implemented in the Supporting Evidence-based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment Initiative. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 43 pp., plus appendices.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child maltreatment, Comparative analysis, Cost effectiveness, Costs, Early intervention programs, Home visiting, Prevention programs, Young children

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Every Child Succeeds. 2014. Moving beyond depression: Greater success for new mothers in home visiting. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 1 v.

Annotation: This website describes a comprehensive, focused, and integrated approach to identifying and treating depression in mothers participating in home visiting programs. The program involves three phases instituted over two years: (1) on-site training of home visitors in identification of maternal depression and role in the program, (2) training of therapists in Cincinnati in in-home cognitive behavioral therapy, and (3) ongoing training and support of therapists. Information about maternal depression, the program's research base, a training calendar, and additional resources about postpartum depression and postpartum support are included.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Depression, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, Therapeutic programs, Training

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Johnson K, Ammerman RT, Van Ginkel JB. 2014. Moving beyond depression: An effective program to treat maternal depression in home visiting–Opportunities for states. Cincinnati, OH: Every Child Succeeds, 19 pp.

Annotation: This brief describes a program that uses in-home cognitive behavioral therapy to treat maternal depression as an added component for home visiting programs. Topics include the impact of maternal depression on women, children, and families; the program's research and results, return on investment, design, and implementation; and opportunities and potential roles for states and home visiting programs.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior change, Cognitive therapy, Comprehensive programs, Costs, Depression, Financing, Home visiting, Maternal health, Mental health, Postpartum care, State programs, Therapeutic programs, Training

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Klebanov PK. (2013). Variation in home visiting of the first three years of life: Links to family characteristics, aspects of home visits, and child outcomes. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University and Columbia University, 44 pp.

Annotation: This paper, which focuses on the Infant Health and Development Program, a randomized multisite study of 985 low-birthweight infants and their families, examines the following three questions: (1) What are the different patterns of home visits? (2) Which child, maternal, and family demographic characteristics and qualities of the home visit are associated with these home-visitation patterns? (3) Are higher frequency patterns of home visits associated with positive effects for children's cognitive and behavioral outcomes and mothers' depression, social support, and knowledge of child development? The authors also examine the significance of the home environment. The paper includes a literature review and a description of the study method, measures, data analysis, and results.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Behavior disorders, Behavior problems, Child behavior, Cognitive development, Depression, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Low birthweight infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support programs, Postpartum depression, Programs, Young children

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[Early Head Start National Resource Center]. 2013. Families with multiple children in the EHS home-based option (rev.). [Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center], 2 pp. (Early Head Start tip sheet; no. 33)

Annotation: This tip sheet, which is intended to provide a basis for dialogue, clarification, and problem solving among Head Start personnel, technical assistance consultants, and grantees, offers information on whether home visits are required for each child for families with more than one child enrolled in the Early Head Start home-based program. The tip sheet provides questions to consider for planning and programming, and relevant Head Start performance standards.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Families, Head Start, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Program planning, Young children

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Matone M, Curtis C, Chesnokova A, Yun K, Kreider A, Curtis M, Rubin D. 2013. Evaluation of maternal and child home visitation programs: Lessons from Pennsylvania. Philadelphia, PA: PolicyLab, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 15 pp. (Evidence to action)

Annotation: This policy brief highlights key concepts to guide state and local maternal and child home visitation program administrators as they make decisions about ongoing or planned program evaluation, as well as strategies for addressing some of the challenges tied to real-world program evaluation. Topics include an overview of public health program evaluation, a short description of what was learned from PolicyLab's evaluation of the Pennsylvania Nurse-Family Partnership program, and a discussion of how the findings can be meaningful for the broader home-visitation community. Contents include data sources for quasi-experimental evaluation.

Contact: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104-4399, Telephone: (215) 590-1000 Web Site: http://www.chop.edu/consumer/index.jsp .

Keywords: Case studies, Child health, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maternal health, Pennsylvania, Program evaluation

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Mattox T, Hunter SB, Kilburn MR, Wiseman SH. 2013. Getting to outcomes for home visiting: How to plan, implement, and evaluate a program in your community to support parents and their young children. Santa Monica, CA: Rand, 118 pp. (Toolkit)

Annotation: This manual aims to support home visiting program implementation. It describes a ten-step process, called Getting To Outcomes® for Home Visiting, that helps empower communities to better plan, implement, and evaluate home visiting programs, with the goal of achieving the best possible outcomes. The model presented in this manual is meant to provide specific guidance, yet be flexible enough to facilitate any home visiting program. It also provides tips, resources, tools, examples, definitions of terms, as well as a bibliography. It was developed for the state of New Mexico.

Contact: Rand Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-3208, Telephone: (310) 393-0411 Fax: 310-393-4818 E-mail: correspondence@rand.org Web Site: http://www.rand.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Case studies, Community based services, Home visiting, Manuals, Needs assessment, Program development, Program evaluation, Program planning

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Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign. 2013. Expanding home visiting research: New measures of success. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Home Visiting Campaign, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief highlights key findings from research conducted to build evidence needed to inform policymakers' decisions related to home visiting and to advance effective practice in home visiting programs. The brief also identifies opportunities for program improvements in states and for further study. Findings are presented in the following areas: lasting benefits of home visiting, for whom is home visiting effective, the importance of focused program content and of measurement, and what it means to be evidence-based.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website, after registration.

Keywords: Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Public policy, Research, State programs, Young children

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Pew Home Visiting Campaign. 2013. Solving social ills through early childhood home visiting. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Home Visiting Campaign, 24 files.

Annotation: This site provides access to 12 commissioned studies on the need for continued evaluation and monitoring of home visiting services in order to maximize effectiveness as programs expand to serve more families in a greater diversity of settings. The reports detail the benefits and limitations of home visiting for children, families, and taxpayers; the value of expanding home visiting to more families; important program characteristics that predict better outcomes; advances in measuring program quality in home visiting; advantages of understanding and encouraging greater program participation; and new approaches being added to existing strategies.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Family support services, Home visiting, Program evaluation, Program participation

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Powers S, Herk M, Hewitt A, eds. 2013. Strengthening home visiting through research. Zero to Three 33(3):1-67,

Annotation: This issue of Zero to Three presents a collection of articles on findings on home visiting program design and implementation from the Pew Home Visiting Campaign. Additional articles focus on efforts of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program to integrate home visiting services into a high-quality, comprehensive early childhood system that promotes health and well-being for pregnant women, parents, caregivers, and children from birth to age 5. In addition to the feature articles, the issue offers perspectives on the relationship between home visiting staffing patterns, training, and outreach activities and maternal program involvement; the other discusses the value of reflective practice for home visitors and the families the serve.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org

Keywords: Community programs, Home visiting, MCH programs

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Salinsky E, Doctors JV (ed.). 2013. Massachusetts: Developing capacity for data-driven home visiting programs in Massachusetts. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts, 18 pp. (State home visiting promising practices brief series, no. 2)

Annotation: This report discusses the Healthy Families Massachusetts home visiting program and its approach in building data collection and analysis capacity. The data system supports service delivery, facilitates performance and outcome monitoring, fosters quality improvement, and helps cultivate political support for home visiting services.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Data collection, Home visiting, Massachusetts, Program description, Program evaluation, State programs

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Boller K, Daro D, Strong D, Zaveri H, Paulsell D, Hargreaves M, Cole R, Del Grosso P, Vogel C, Burwick A, Meagher C, Barrett K. 2012. Data collection instruments for the evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment cross-site evaluation. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 11 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This manual provides data use collection instruments used in a national cross-site evaluation of home visiting programs. It includes protocols from site visits; a protocol for interviews on system change activities, along with a sample logic model; a survey of partners; an instrument for collecting data on program fidelity; and an instrument for a web-based time use survey.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Program evaluation, Protocols, Surveys

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Burwick A, Strong D, Xue Y, Koball H, Coffee-Borden B, Zaveri H, Boller K, Daro D. 2012. Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Cross-site evaluation cost study background and design update. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research; Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 22 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report provides background and design information for assessing the costs of home visiting programs that aim to prevent child maltreatment. Topics include the purpose of cost analyses, existing literature on the costs of home visiting program models, study design, and approaches to the collection and analysis of cross-site cost study data.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Evaluation methods, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention programs, Research design

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Del Grosso P, Kleinman R, Esposito AM, Sama-Miller E, Paulsell D. 2012. Assessing the evidence of effectiveness of home visiting program models implemented in tribal communities: Final report [rev.]. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 36 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This report describes findings from a review of home visiting programs implemented in tribal communities or evaluated with American Indian or Alaska Native families and children. The report describes the review process that the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) team used to identity, screen, and assess the research literature and review results. (HomVEE is a systematic review of home visiting research launched by the Administration for Children and Families and the Department of Health and Human Services in 2009.) The report also presents descriptive information from studies on participant outcomes measures, provides descriptions of the home visiting model characteristics, and discusses lessons learned.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Seventh Floor West, Washington, DC 20447, Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/opre/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Alaska natives, American Indians, Children, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Prevention, Research

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Johnson-Staub C, Schmit S. 2012. Home away from home: A toolkit for planning home visiting partnerships with family, friend, and neighbor caregivers. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 53 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides state policymakers and advocates with strategies for extending and expanding access to state- or federally-funded home visiting through partnerships with providers of Family, Friend, and Neighbor (FFN) child care. The toolkit includes an overview of what home visiting partnerships with FFN providers may look like and the role of such partnerships; a tool to walk through questions that may need to be answered as states develop home visiting and FFN partnerships, as well as a discussion of potential policy changes that may need to be considered; and case studies of existing partnerships between home visiting models and FFN providers in specific states and communities.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Advocacy, Case studies, Child care, Families, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, Public policy, State programs

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Korfmacher J, Laszewski A, Sparr M, Hammel J. 2012. Assessing home visiting program quality: Final report to the Pew Center on the States. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Pew Center on the States, 96 pp.

Annotation: This final report presents the findings of a study to field test a comprehensive assessment tool to measure implementation of best practice elements in home visiting programs. The report discusses identifying common best practice elements of home visiting programs, measuring quality, and the evidence base for specific indicators. It includes a literature review of self assessment and credentialing tools, home visit measures and model evaluations.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, Research

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MDRC, Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation Technical Assistance Team. 2012. Home visit observation brief: Overview of observational measurement instruments available for home visiting. New York, NY: MDRC, 10 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of available home visit observation instruments for assessing home visit quality and content for use in reflective supervision practices, professional development, research evaluation, or continuous quality improvement. The intent of this document is to support the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) program as part of the provision of technical assistance (TA) to funded grantees.

Contact: MDRC, 16 East 34th Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016-4326, Telephone: (212) 532-3200 Fax: (212) 684-0832 E-mail: information@mdrc.org Web Site: http://www.mdrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Home visiting, Observation

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Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Infant Health Program. 2012. Maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 12 pp.

Annotation: This resource is a printout of presentation slides that provide information about maternal and infant health priorities and opportunities in home visiting. The presentation discusses opportunities for preventing premature birth. obesity, and maternal depression in the context of home visiting, Best practices for safe sleep, infant illness care, and infant feeding problems are also discussed.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the web site.

Keywords: Depression, Feeding disorders, Health care, Home visiting, Infant feeding, Infant health, Mental health, Obesity, Postpartum depression, Preterm birth, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Women's health

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Pew Center on the States and National Academy for State Health Policy. 2012. Medicaid financing of early childhood home visiting programs: Options, opportunities, and challenges. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts, 62 pp.

Annotation: This report examines how states are using (or could use) Medicaid to finance home visiting services. The report discusses findings from a literature review, a scan of state policies and practices, and an expert panel meeting on mechanisms through which Medicaid could pay for home visiting. Six case studies illustrating states' experiences are included.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Financing, Home visiting, Medicaid, Oral health, Policy, State initiatives, Young children

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Addressing challenging behavior in children. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar, originally broadcast June 5, 2012, shares effective strategies that both home visiting professionals and parents can use to prevent and respond to disruptive or challenging behavior from their children and promote healthier families.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Behavior development, Behavior modification, Children, Family relations, Home visiting, Parenting skills

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Engaging Latino families in home visiting programs. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar highlights best practices in engaging Latino families in home visiting programs. Panelists from three different home visiting models share approaches and tools that have led to their success in serving the needs of children and families. Topics included strategies for recruiting and retaining families in the program, specific training for home visitors, program and curriculum adaptation, and research on Latino families’ participation and outcomes.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Audiovisual materials, Cultural sensitivity, Family support services, Hispanic Americans, Home visiting, Newborn infants

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Fathers and home visiting: What do we know?. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast May 1, 2012, focuses on improving outcomes for mothers and children by studying the potential contributions of fathers. Questions include What is known about fathers’ involvement in home visiting and the impact on family outcomes? Which models have increased fathers’ participation and how? What questions remain unanswered? Panelists on this webinar discuss these issues and recommend concrete strategies that have shown success in their communities.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Family support services, Father child relations, Fathers, Home visiting

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Linking Project Connect with home visiting models to tackle domestic violence. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast January 24, 2012, highlightes the multi-pronged approach of Project Connect at both the national and state levels and provides information for providers, advocates, and state leaders to structure effective home visiting programs. Panelists discuss how Project Connect curriculum and associated tools increase the capacity of home visiting programs to respond effectively with a research-informed approach to addressing domestic violence.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Domestic violence, Family support services, Home visiting, Prevention, Screening

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Medicaid financing options for home visiting programs. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This webinar, broadcast April 10, 2012, focuses on providing concrete strategies and examples that states can implement to effectively leverage Medicaid dollars for home visiting programs. Panelists discuss how states can align specific services and desired outcomes of home visiting programs with existing Medicaid financing mechanisms.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Health care financing, Home visiting, Medicaid, State initiatives

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Pew Center on the States, Home Visiting Campaign. 2012. Strengthening professional development in home visiting programs. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, (The case for home visiting video series)

Annotation: This archived webinar highlights strategies for building comprehensive, statewide professional development systems for the home visiting workforce. Panelists discuss statewide professional development systems in Illinois and Virginia and how these systems play a critical role in supporting home visiting programs’ desired outcomes for families and children. The webinar also includes remarks on professional development systems from Terry Adirim, Director of the Office of Special Health Affairs in the Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Illinois, Audiovisual materials, Case studies, Home visiting, Resources for professionals, State initiatives, Virginia, Work force

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Salinsky E, Doctors JV (Ed.). 2012. Kentucky: Joining HANDS for a comprehensive system of care. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 10 pp. (Home visiting issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief highlights Kentucky's Joining HANDS for a Comprehensive Systems of Care program, which seeks to incorporate home visiting within comprehensive, integrated early childhood systems that are capable of yielding measurable improvements in the lives of children and families as well as meaningful savings to taxpayers. In addition to providing information about the program, the brief explains what home visiting is and discusses cultivating a systems approach through home visiting.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Kentucky, Programs, Service delivery systems, Service integration, Young children

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Speilberger J, Gitlow E, Winje C, Harden A, Banman A, Dadisman K. 2012. Building a system of support for evidence-based home visiting programs in Illinois: Findings from year 2 of the Strong Foundations evaluation. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 121 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information from an evaluation of home visiting programs in Illinois that are part of Strong Foundations—a program that supports the implementation, scaling up, and sustainability of evidence-based home-visiting programs for the prevention of child maltreatment. The report presents perspectives on the state system from key informants at state and local program levels and discusses local programs with a focus on five main topics: characteristics of communities and programs, staff training and supervision, program quality and fidelity, programs' ability to meet families' needs, and the availability of and linkages to other community services and resources.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child maltreatment, Communities, Family support services, Home visiting, Illinois, Local programs, Low income groups, Prevention, Program evaluation, State programs, Training

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New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department. [2011]. Home visiting service manual. [Santa Fe, NM]: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 138 pp.

Annotation: This manual describes the underlying research-based philosopy and defines practice parameters, standards, and reporting activities for all home visiting programs funded through New Mexico's Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD). The manual also provides an overview of CYFD home visiting programs, defines home visiting, and discusses the target population, eligibility criteria, service and evaluation components, staffing requirements, safety and risk reduction, staff supervision, service requirements and core components, and documentation and file maintenance. This manual also includes the Home Visiting Database Manual v2.

Contact: University of New Mexico Center for Development and Disability, 2300 Menaul Boulevard, NE, Albuquerque, NM 87107, Telephone: (505) 272-3000 Fax: (505) 272-5280 Web Site: http://cdd.unm.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: State programs, Eligibility, Evaluation, Families, Home visiting, Infants, New Mexico, Safety, Service delivery, Staff, Supervision, Young children

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U.S. Department of Defense, Military Community and Family Policy. [2011]. Putting baby safely to sleep: Tools for new parent support program home visitors. [no place]: U.S. Department of Defense, Military Community and Family Policy, 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet for home visitors provides ideas and resources for sharing messages about safe infant sleep with new and expectant parents. The fact sheet discusses the home visitor's role and opportunities for sharing safe sleep messages and presents key message for parents and key online resources.

Contact: U.S. Department of Defense, Military Community and Family Policy, Web Site: http://www.militaryinstallations.dod.mil/MOS/f?p=MI:CONTENT2:0::::COHE:250644 Available from the website.

Keywords: Consumer education materials, Home visiting, Infants, Parents, Pregnant women, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position

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Virginia Home Visiting Consortium. [2011]. Directory of Viriginia home visiting programs. (Richmond, VA): Virginia Home Visiting Consortium,

Annotation: This website provides a Virginia state atlas with links to home visiting programs in all five of the state's regions. Users can select from an alphabetical list of counties and independent cities within the Commonwealth of Virginia to obtain contact information. The website also provides access to web-based training modules for home visitors and supervisors; links to state and national programs and resources; and announcements about new regulations, guidelines, and materials for use with families participating in home visiting programs.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, VA , Telephone: 540-568-5251 Fax: 540-568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconfortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: County programs, Directories, Home visiting, State programs, Virginia

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Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Pew Center on the States. 2011-. National Summit on Quality in Home Visiting Programs. [Cincinnati, OH]: Every Child Succeeds, annual.

Annotation: This website provides information about the National Summit on Quality in Home Visiting Programs, held in February of the year, in Washington, DC. The site includes general information about the summit as well as links to speaker presentations and the summit agenda.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference proceedings, Home visiting, Quality assurance

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Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors and Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. 2011. Opportunities for collaboration between state oral health and maternal and child health programs to improve early childhood oral health. Sparks, NV: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 9 pp.

Annotation: This brief discusses efforts to integrate oral health activities and information into state maternal and child health (MCH) early childhood programs to improve oral health status. The brief focuses on MCH state-level early childhood programs relevant to oral health, specifically the Early Childhood Comprehensive System (ECCS) and the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. The brief also presents examples of oral health integration into state ECCS programs, other opportunities to collaborate with state MCH programs, and resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Dental Directors, 3858 Cashill Boulevard, Reno, NV 89509, Telephone: (775) 626-5008 Fax: (775) 626-9268 E-mail: info@astdd.org Web Site: http://www.astdd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Early childhood, Federal MCH programs, Health systems agencies, Home visiting, Oral health, Service delivery systems, Service integration, State MCH programs, Young children

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Avellar S, Paulsell D. 2011. Lessons learned from the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness Review. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report describes key lessons learned from the first year of the Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness (HomVEE) systematic review of home visiting research launched by Mathematica Policy Research under contract with the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation at the Administration for Children and Families, Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS). The report discusses the current state of evidence on the effectiveness of early childhood home visiting, gaps in the research literature that create challenges for assessing effectiveness, and suggestions for strengthening future research in this area. An overview of the review process and standards, a description of the various research designs used in the reviewed studies, and challenges related to the accurate assessment of effectiveness are included.

Contact: U.S. Children's Bureau, Administration on Children, Youth, and Families , , 1250 Maryland Avenue, S.W., Eighth Floor , Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: Fax: E-mail: Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Home visiting, Research reviews

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California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program. 2011. Affordable Care Act, Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Supplemental information request for the submission of the updated state plan for a state home visiting program. [Sacramento, CA]: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, 238 pp.

Annotation: This report describes an updated California plan for a state home visiting program. Topics include the program's development, identification of the state's targeted at-risk communities, a description of home visiting program goals and objectives, selection of proposed models and how they meet targeted community needs, program implementation plans, meeting legislatively-mandated benchmarks, and administrating the state home visiting program. Additional information is provided on technical assistance and reporting requirements.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Health planning, Home visiting, Needs assessment, Program descriptions, State programs

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CityMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2011. Strengthening your MCH workforce through cultural competency. [Omaha, NE]: CityMatCH; [Washington, DC]: National Association of County and City Health Officials, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This webinar, which was held on March 3, 2011, and hosted by the National Association of County and City Health Officials, focused on how to initiate, strengthen, and apply lessons in cultural competence to local maternal and child public health programs, especially home visiting programs. The webinar defines cultural competence, discusses its role in work force development for local public health professionals and barriers to becoming culturally competent, and provides examples of how to apply cultural competence to a work force development opportunity for a home visiting program.

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org

Keywords: Work force, Cultural competence, Culturally competent services, Home visiting, Local programs, Public health, Staff development

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Del Grosso P, Hargreaves M, Paulsell D, Vogel C, Strong DA, Zaveri H, Angus MH, Coffee-Borden B, Cole R, Barrett K, Boller K, Daro D. 2011. Building infrastructure to support home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Two-year findings from the cross-site evaluation of the Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting Initiative. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research; Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 72 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report describes cross-site findings from the first 2 years (2008-2010) of the Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment initiative (EBHV), which was designed to build knowledge about how to build infrastructure and service-delivery systems necessary to implement, scale up, and sustain evidence-based home visiting program models as a strategy to prevent child maltreatment. The report discusses (1) the state or local context with respect to home visiting as EBHV grantees planned and implemented their projects, (2) partnerships that grantees formed to support planning and implementation of new home visiting programs, (3) infrastructure needed to implement program models in the early stages of the EBHV grant, and (4) how grantees and their associated home-visiting-implementing agencies prepared for and implemented new programs.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Collaboration, Grants, Home visiting, Prevention, Program evaluation, Programs, Service delivery systems

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2011. A closer look at the Early Head Start Home-Based Program option. Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 1 DVD-ROM.

Annotation: This webcast focuses on Early Head Start's home-based program option. The webcast explains why some families enrolled in Head Start choose the home-based option and discusses what the program offers. The webcast also discusses how the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has allocated additional funds to states for home visiting programs for children and families living in at-risk communities.

Contact: Early Head Start National Resource Center, Office of Head Start, Eighth Floor Portals Building, Washington, DC 20024, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 E-mail: HeadStart@eclkc.info Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/ehsnrc Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Early Head Start, Families, Federal programs, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Parenting skills, Pregnant women, Relationships, Rural populations, Young children

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Every Child Succeeds. 2011. Every child succeeds referral form. [Cincinnati, OH: Cincinnati Children's Hospital], 2 items.

Annotation: This one-page referral form is designed to help community agencies, hospitals, and prenatal clinics arrange professional home visiting services for new and expectant parents, particularly first-time mothers, and their infants. The document is designed to capture information such as demographics, prenatal care initiation, age, income level, language, and need for interpretation services. Separate forms are available for referral to programs in Kentucky and Ohio. The forms are used by Every Child Succeeds (ECS). a voluntary prevention program that operates two evidence-based national models (Healthy Families America® and Nurse Family Partnership®) to promote positive parent-child interaction, healthy child development, and family self-sufficiency.

Contact: Every Child Succeeds, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Avenue, ML 3005, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, Telephone: (513) 636-2830 Fax: (513) 636-2460 E-mail: everychildsucceeds@cchmc.org Web Site: http://www.everychildsucceeds.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Forms, Home visiting, Kentucky, Ohio, Referrals, State initiatives

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Golden O, Hawkins A, Beardslee W. 2011. Home visiting and maternal depression: Seizing the opportunities to help mothers and young children. Wasington, DC: Urban Institute, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide looks at home visiting as a promising approach to help identify mothers with depression and to connect their families to available services. Drawing on research as well as interviews with low‐income mothers, home visitors, and other service providers, the guide offers practical insights about how home visiting programs can enhance their own work and their links to other programs in the community—such as mental health treatment—to better serve depressed mothers and their young children. Included are a set of challenges that home visiting programs currently face in working with depressed mothers and identifies promising approaches to overcome each challenge.

Contact: Urban Institute, 2100 M Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 833-7200 Fax: (202) 467-5775 E-mail: http://www.urban.org/about/contact.cfm Web Site: http://www.urban.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Depression, Early childhood, High risk groups, Home visiting, Mental health, Mothers, Postpartum depression, Program improvement, Service delivery, Young children

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Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. 2011. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Supplemental information request for the submission of the updated state plan for a state home visiting program. [Boise, ID]: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, 63 pp.

Annotation: This supplemental information request provides guidance for preparing an updated state plan for a state home visiting program in Idaho, including identification of the at-risk community or communities where home visiting services are to be provided, a detailed assessment of the particular needs of that community or communities in terms of risk factors, community strengths, and existing services; identification of home visiting services proposed to be implemented to meet identified needs; a description of the state and local infrastructure available to support the program; specification of any additional infrastructure support necessary to achieve program success; and a plan for collecting benchmark data, conducting continuous quality improvement, and performing any required research or evaluation.

Contact: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 83720, 450 West State Street, Boise, ID 83720-0036, Telephone: (800) 926-2588 Secondary Telephone: (208) 334-5500 Web Site: http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, High risk groups, Home visiting, Idaho, Low income groups, Program evaluation, Research, Risk factors, Services, State MCH programs

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Maine Families, Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Project. 2011. Maine state plan. (Upd. ed.). [Augusta, ME]: Maine Department of Health and Human Services Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting (MIECHV) Project, 114 pp.

Annotation: This state plan for Maine's maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program identifies the state's at-risk communities; describes the program's goals and objective; presents the proposed home visiting model and an explanation of how it meets the needs of identified communities; describes the program implementation plan, the plan for meeting legislatively managed benchmarks, the plan for program administration, and the plan for continuous quality improvement; and discusses technical assistance needs. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maine Department of Health and Human Services, 221 State Street, Augusta, ME 04333, Telephone: (207) 287-3707 Secondary Telephone: (800) 606-0215 Fax: (207) 287-3005 E-mail: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/contactus.shtml#program_questions Web Site: http://www.maine.gov/dhhs/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Legislation, Low income groups, Maine, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Parents, Pregnant women, Prevention, State programs, Young children

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Manor, R. 2011. Report to OAPP: Supporting teen families, year five 2009-2010. Milwaukee, WI: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 122 pp.

Annotation: This final report summarizes the findings of research done on the Supporting Teen Families program in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for Year Five of the project and cumulatively for Years One-Five. This program, developed and implemented by Rosalie Manor Community and Family Services and based on Healthy Start, Hawaii's Statewide Home Visitor Program,works to prevent repeat teen pregnancy using a home visitation model. The goal of the program is to assist adolescent parents in developing assets to form safe, healthy families and to avoid repeat pregnancies. Four outcome areas were tested and analyzed: (1) building strong family relationships, (2) learning strategies to become self-sufficient, (3) learning strategies to stay safe and healthy, and (4) demonstrating responsible family planning behaviors and attitudes.

Contact: Planning Council for Health and Human Services, 1243 North 10th Street, Suite 200, Milwaukee, WI 53205, Telephone: (414) 224-0404 E-mail: http://planningcouncil.org/contact.php Web Site: http://planningcouncil.org

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, Family planning services, Family support services, Final reports, Home visiting, Pregnant adolescents, Prevention services, State programs, Wisconsin

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Mathematica Policy Research. 2011. The Public Health Nursing Early Intervention Program for Adolescent Mothers. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, Home Visiting Evidence of Effectiveness, 3 pp. (HomVEE Short Report on the Early Intervention Program)

Annotation: This report provides summary information about the Public Health Nursing Early Intervention Program for Adolescent Mothers, including a review of studies of the program conducted between 1979 and 2009 and the evidence of the effectiveness of this home visiting service delivery model. Contact information for the developer of the model is also provided.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Early intervention programs, Home visiting, Models, Research reviews

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MDRC. 2011. Building a culture of quality in home visitation. New York, NY: MDRC,

Annotation: This webinar focused on the essential prerequisites to developing and implementing a continuous quality improvement (CQI) strategy in home visiting programs. The webinar was held on January 13, 2011, the first in a series of technical assistance webinars. The series is part of the Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation (DOHVE) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, which is providing technical assistance to grantees of the federal home visiting program and developing design options for conducting a national evaluation of the federal initiative.

Contact: MDRC, 16 East 34th Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016-4326, Telephone: (212) 532-3200 Fax: (212) 684-0832 E-mail: information@mdrc.org Web Site: http://www.mdrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Home visiting, Program evaluation, Quality assurance, Research design, Technical assistance

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MDRC, Design Options for Home Visiting Evaluation Technical Assistance Team. 2011. Life skills progression brief: Information and guidelines for use in meeting MIECHV benchmarks. New York, NY: MDRC, 7 pp.

Annotation: This document describes the Life Skills Progression, an outcome summary tool that home visitors can use to gather and organize information about family competencies, and outlines appropriate use of the instrument in meeting benchmarks of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Topics include scales, format, scoring, training, psychometrics, and data management. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: MDRC, 16 East 34th Street, 19th Floor, New York, NY 10016-4326, Telephone: (212) 532-3200 Fax: (212) 684-0832 E-mail: information@mdrc.org Web Site: http://www.mdrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Guidelines, Home visiting, Life skills, MCH programs, Outcome and process assessment

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National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices. 2011. Maximizing the impact of state early childhood home visitation programs. Washington, DC: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, 11 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief examines how governors can better integrate home visiting programs into effective and comprehensive state early childhood systems. Key strategies include: promoting, coordinating, planning and shared accountability across state agencies, developing research-based quality standards, and improving data linkages to track outcomes and better target services.

Contact: National Governors Association, Center for Best Practices, Hall of the States, 444 North Capitol Street, Suite 267, Washington, DC 20001-1512, Telephone: (202) 624-5300 Fax: (202) 624-5313 E-mail: webmaster@nga.org Web Site: http://www.nga.org/cms/center Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood systems, Health care reform, Home care systems, Home visiting, State programs, Systems integration

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Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services. 2011. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Final supplemental information request for the submission of the updated state plan for a state home visiting program. Lincoln, NE: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, 2 pp.

Annotation: This document constitutes an outline of the final supplemental information request for the submission of the updated state plan for Nebraska's Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. The summary includes the date of submission and steps to be completed.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Grants, Home visiting, Infants, Nebraska, State programs, Women, Young children

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Pew Center on the States. 2011. Policy framework to strengthen home visiting programs. [Washington, DC]: Pew Center on the States, 27 pp.

Annotation: This policy framework details six policy elements to strengthen the effectiveness and accountability of home visiting programs. The purpose of the policy elements is to support strong families and ensure that tax dollars are well spent. Policy elements discussed are (1) clearly define the purpose and expected outcomes of the home-visiting program, (2) invest in home-visiting models that have a proven record of success, (3) track public dollars, (4) monitor and evaluate publicly funded programs to ensure effectiveness, (5) target at-risk communities and/or high-risk populations, and (6) invest enough money to reach all eligible families.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Costs, Families, Family support programs, Financing, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Prevention, programs

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Pew Center on the States. 2011. States and the new federal home visiting initiative: An assessment from the starting line. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 37 pp.

Annotation: This report presents a picture of the national landscape of state-administered home visiting and provides recommendations for policymakers. The report is based on a survey of agency leaders in all 50 states and the District of Columbia to investigate the extent to which states are meeting the objectives of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program (part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010). It documents the quality, funding, administration, and oversight of each state's programs. The report provides key findings from the survey and snapshots of home visiting in select states (California, Kansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina). Brief descriptions of federally approved evidence-based home visiting models are included.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Health care reform, Home visiting, Program descriptions, State initiatives, Statistical data

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Pew Charitable Trusts. 2011. Pew inventory of state home visiting programs. Philadelphia, PA: Pew Charitable Trusts,

Annotation: This web site provides an inventory of state and national home visiting program contacts, investments and program strategies. Contents include a national overview, a description of home visiting, why home visiting matters now, and trends to watch, along with definitions and methodologies.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Home visiting, National programs, Program descriptions, State programs

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Rhode Island Department of Health. 2011. First connections: Rhode Island's home visiting program. [Providence, RI]: Rhode Island Department of Health, 2 pp.

Annotation: This brochure describes the First Connections home visiting program in the state of Rhode Island. It explains how the program can help families with young children; outlines the services that families can gain access to through the First Connections program; provides a list of frequent questions that home visitors can answer; and provides contact information for First Connections agencies across the state of Rhode Island. It is available in English and Spanish. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Rhode Island Department of Health, Three Capitol Hill, Providence, RI 02908, Telephone: (401) 222-5960 E-mail: http://www.health.state.ri.us/contactus Web Site: http://www.health.state.ri.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Rhode Island, Spanish language materials, State programs

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Salinsky E. 2011. Home, but not alone: Evidence-based maternal, infant, and early childhood home visitation. Washington, DC: National Health Policy Forum, 17 pp. (Issue brief no. 843)

Annotation: This issue brief provides an overview of the newly established Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting program, describes existing approaches to home visitation, and discusses the implications of federal funding for state and local practices.

Contact: National Health Policy Forum, George Washington University, 2131 K Street, N.W., Suite 500, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 872-1390 E-mail: nhpf@gwu.edu Web Site: http://www.nhpf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal MCH programs, Home visiting, Infant health, Mothers, Newborn infants, Parent support services, Program descriptions

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Schreiber L, Gebhard B, Colvard J. 2011. Zero to Three home visiting community planning tool. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 19 pp.

Annotation: This tool is intended to help communities plan for new or expand existing home visiting services. Topics include identifying community needs and strengths based on data, exploring current home visiting assets and service gaps, choosing an evidence-based program model, and analyzing components of both program- and system-level implementation that are critical to the replication of high-quality home visiting programs.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Home visiting, Program planning

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Zero To Three. 2011. Federal home visiting grants and implications for Early Head Start. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 2 items.

Annotation: This website contains materials from a conference call held on February 23, 2011, to provide technical assistance to states on integrating Early Head Start into state early childhood systems. The conference call focused on the Supplemental Information Request (SIR) for the Submission of the Updated State Plan for a State Home Visiting Program (SIR). Topics included an overview of the SIR and the implications for Early Head Start, and home visiting planning processes in states.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Federal MCH programs, Home visiting, Program planning, State MCH programs, Technical assistance

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California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program. [2010]. California home visiting program: Statewide home visiting needs assessment. [Sacramento, CA]: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, 502 pp.

Annotation: This California home visiting needs assessment fulfills statewide legislative requirement to identify communities at risk for poor health outcomes among women, mothers, infants, children and adolescents. The assessment consists of the following components: (1) a statewide data report; (2) a definition of “community;” (3) data reports for communities identified as at risk; (4) a description of the quality and capacity of existing home visitation programs, (5) a description of the capacity to provide substance abuse counseling and treatment services; and (6) a narrative of needs assessment results and a discussion of how the state will address unmet needs. Indicators considered as part of the assessment include poverty, crime, domestic violence, high rates of high-school dropouts, substance abuse, unemployment, and child maltreatment. A copy of the state's capacity assessment home visiting survey is included as an appendix.

Contact: California Department of Public Health, Maternal, Child and Adolescent Health Program, MS 8305, P.O. Box 997420, Sacramento, CA 95899-7420, Telephone: (866) 241-0395 Fax: (916) 650-0305 E-mail: mchinet@cdph.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.cdph.ca.gov/programs/MCAH/Pages/default.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Home visiting, Needs assessment, Reports, State MCH programs

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Connecticut Birth to Three System. [2010]. Early intervention home visits. Hartford, CT: Connecticut Birth to Three System, 1 video (11 min., 45 sec.).

Annotation: This online video discusses the early intervention home visit program in Connecticut. It describes what parents can expect during the visit, interacting with the primary caregiver and the child to promote early learning during routine activities such as mealtime and playtime. Models are discussed as "parent coaching" and emphasis is placed on the home visitor and caregiver working together during and after the visit in helping the infant and young child to develop. The video is available in English and Spanish.

Contact: Connecticut Birth to Three System , 460 Capitol Avenue , Hartford , CT 06106, Telephone: (860) 418-6134 Secondary Telephone: (800) 505-7000 Fax: (860) 418-6003 E-mail: linda.goodman@ct.gov Web Site: http://www.birth23.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Caregivers, Connecticut, Early childhood development, Early intervention, Home visiting, Infants, Parent child relations, Spanish language materials, Young children

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Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Family and Community Health Bureau. [2010]. Montana ACA Home Visiting Program narrative. Helena, MT: Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Family and Community Health Bureau, 11 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about the Montana ACA [Affordable Care Act] Home Visiting Program. The report provides background on home visiting in the state and discusses the inventory of information and data available for a needs assessment, gaps in available data, state capacity to compile data and anticipated obstacles, barriers to and opportunities for coordination of home visiting needs assessments with other needs assessments, the state approach to conducting a needs assessment, and the anticipated need for technical assistance. A statement of intent is also included.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Home visiting, Montana, Needs assessment, Program coordination, State programs, Statistical data, Technical assistance

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Pew Center on the States. 2010-. Model practices in state home visiting: Getting from good to great. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States,

Annotation: This site hosts archives of webinars in the series and highlights promising practices in administering state home visiting systems. With a specific focus on providing information and ideas to state agency staff, the series showcases the successes of state leaders from across the country as they tackle good governance strategies for their home visiting systems. The site describes the webinar and provides various presentation materials. Topics in 2010 include funding, using evidence, implementation, evaluation, and coordination. Information about upcoming webinars in the series is also provided.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Home visiting, Model programs, Multimedia

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2010. Home visiting: Past, present, and future. Zero to Three 30(6):1-71,

Annotation: This journal issue provides articles on these topics: improving state policy for home visiting; assessing home visit quality; a history of the Home Visiting Coalition; the Virginia Home Visiting Consortium; the Pew Home Visiting Campaign; setting and maintaining professional boundaries in infant mental health home visiting; home visitation with psychologically vulnerable families; and perspectives from parents.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $15.00.

Keywords: Federal programs, Home visiting, Public policy

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Alabama Department of Children's Affairs. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Statewide needs assessment for the state of Alabama. [Montgomery, AL]: Alabama Department of Children's Affairs, 29 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment identifies (1) at-risk communities in Alabama, (2) home-visiting resources for Alabama families with infants and children from birth through age 5, and (3) gaps in services as they relate to areas of greatest risk vs. locations of home visiting programs in the state. The needs assessment provides an overview of child well-being in Alabama and discusses coordination with other statewide needs assessment and reports. It also includes a statewide data report, a discussion of the approach to identifying at-risk communities, data reports for each at-risk community, and an overview pf the quality and capacity of existing home-visiting programs.

Contact: Alabama Department of Children's Affairs, 135 South Union Street, Suite 215, Montgomery, AL 36130, Telephone: (334) 353-2700 Fax: (334) 353-2701 E-mail: info@children.alabama.gov Web Site: http://www.children.alabama.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Programs, Alabama, Families, Family support programs, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Needs assessment, Statistical data, Underserved communities, Young children

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Arizona Department of Health Services and Inter-Agency Leadership Team. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Needs assessment—Arizona. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona Department of Health Services, 104 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This Arizona state needs assessment presents and analyzes data required by the Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Statewide, community level, and population-based data are presented for indicators including premature birth, low birth weight, infant mortality, poverty, crime, domestic violence, school dropout rates, substance abuse by youth, unemployment, and child maltreatment. Additional indicators include: (1) the rate of unintentional injuries among children under age 18, (2) teen birth rate among ages 15-17, (3) percent of women initiating prenatal care in the first trimester, (4) youth alcohol use, and (5) youth cigarette use. A detailed summary of early childhood home visitation programs in the state of Arizona is included, along with an assessment of gaps in services. Risk profiles for selected communities -- including Tribal nations -- are presented. Data sources include the Title V Needs Assessment, which presented data from Arizona Vital Statistics, the Arizona Department of Economic Security and the Arizona Department of Education (Head Start agency), the U.S. Census and Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the Arizona Hospital Discharge Database.

Contact: Arizona Department of Health Services, 150 North 18th Avenue, Phoenix, AZ 85007-2670, Telephone: (602) 542-1025 Fax: (602) 542-0883 E-mail: piowebmaster@azdhs.gov Web Site: http://www.azdhs.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Early childhood, Home visiting, Needs assessment, Reports, State MCH programs

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[Arizona] Early Childhood Home Visiting Task Force. 2010. The vision for early childhood home visiting services in Arizona: A plan of action 2010-2015. [Phoenix, AZ]: Arizona First Things First, 52 pp.

Annotation: This report describes how the state of Arizona plans to provide home visiting services as part of its overall system of early childhood development during the five-year period from 2010-2015. It provides an overview of families with young children in the state of Arizona; describes the state's current home visiting programs; and provides a framework for the future growth and development of such programs. Included are recommendations and an implementation plan provided by the state's Home Visiting Task Force, which call for the continued involvement and collaboration among funders and providers of service, methods to assure high quality, effective home visiting services, and priorities for targeting new funding opportunities. Specific goals and objectives are provided. The appendices include descriptions of home visiting programs in the state; tables indicating populations and risk factors; risk factors by county; and proposed standard home visitor qualifications and training requirements.

Contact: Arizona First Things First, 4000 North Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, AZ 85012, Telephone: (602) 771-5100 Secondary Telephone: (877) 803-7234 E-mail: http://www.azftf.gov/Lists/ContactUs/ContactFTF.aspx?Source=/Pages/ContactUsThankYou.aspx Web Site: http://www.azftf.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Arizona, Families, Home visiting, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Young children

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Arkansas Department of Health. 2010. Narrative for Arkansas home visiting needs assessment: Supplemental information request. [Little Rock, AR]: Arkansas Department of Health, 17 pp.

Annotation: This narrative report provides supplemental data relevant to home visiting in Arkansas. Topics include (1) a state data report, (2) a definition of community and a justification for chosen communities at risk, (3) data for communities at risk, (4) home visiting capacity in communities at risk, (5) capacity for substance abuse treatment within the state and within communities at risk, and (6) a summary of the needs assessment results.

Contact: Arkansas Department of Health, 4815 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205, Telephone: (501) 661-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 462-0599 Web Site: http://www.healthy.arkansas.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: State MCH programs, Arkansas, Communities, High risk groups, Home visiting, Needs assessment, Statistical data, Substance abuse, Treatment

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Buxbaum J. 2010. Making connections: Medicaid, CHIP, and Title V working together on state medical home initiatives. Portland, ME: National Academy for State Health Policy, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights best practices and policy considerations for collaborative medical home building between Medicaid, the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), and Title V agencies. It describes current interagency collaborations in select states across the country and explores the ways in which such partnerships contribute to state medical home initiatives. The report discusses the importance of laying foundations for partnerships and how interagency partners can work together to engage patients, families, health care providers, and practices in a coordinated effort to build strong systems of care. The report compares collaborative initiatives in the states of Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Pennsylvania, and Texas.

Contact: National Academy for State Health Policy, 10 Free Street, Second Floor, Portland, ME 04101, Telephone: (207) 874-6524 Secondary Telephone: (202) 903-0101 Fax: (207) 874-6527 E-mail: info@nashp.org Web Site: http://www.nashp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Health care systems, Interagency cooperation, Medical home, Model programs, Policy, State initiatives

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Cawthorne A, Arons J. 2010. There's no place like home: Home visiting programs can support pregnant women and new parents. [Washington, DC]: Center for American Progress, 13 pp.

Annotation: This brief focuses on home visiting for parents of infants and young children. It reviews existing programs to illustrate successful elements and to point out areas that need improvement. The brief also examines the effects of poverty on mothers and young children, discusses why home visiting programs are a good investment, and looks at how policymakers and stakeholders can craft effective programs for vulnerable families.

Contact: Center for American Progress, 1333 H Street, N.W., 10th Floor, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 682-1611 Fax: (202) 682-1867 E-mail: progress@AmericanProgress.org Web Site: http://www.americanprogress.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Costs, Families, Family support programs, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Mothers, Poverty, Vulnerability, Young children

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Center for Law and Social Policy. 2010. Detailed summary of home visitation program in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a summary of the home visitation program that is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, which President Barak Obama signed on March 23, 2010. The act includes $1.5 billion in mandatory funding for high-quality, evidence-based, voluntary early childhood home visitation services. The report describes the purpose of the act, statutory authority, federal and state administration, needs assessment, requirements for grant application, eligible entities and families, technical assistance, prioritized service population, benchmarks, outcomes, requirements, criteria for evidence of effectiveness, priority funding, evaluation, research, reports to Congress, payment of grants, grants to tribes and to nonprofits, maintenance of effort, appropriations, reservation and availability of funds, and applications of other provisions of Title V.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation, Families, Federal programs, Funding, Grants, Health services, Home visiting, Infants, Legislation, Low income groups, Research, Vulnerability, Young children

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Child Trends. 2010. Home visiting application process: A guide for planning state needs assessments. Child Trends Highlights 1(4):1-25,

Annotation: This brief outlines steps and components for completing the grant application process for the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program as outlined by the authoring legislation or guidance offered by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the Administration for Children and Families. It provides resource information that can be used in planning and conducting the needs assessment, identifying high-risk populations, and selecting and measuring benchmarks. Information on state data sources and statistics is included.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Benchmarking, Federal grants, High risk groups, Home visiting, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Statistics

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Children's Defense Fund. 2010. New investments to help children and families: The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and the Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. [Washington, DC]: Children's Defense Fund, 5 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information about the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program, which is part of the Patient Protection Aand Affordable Care Act. The fact sheet explains what early childhood home visiting programs are, how the act supports home visiting, how much funding for the program each state will receive, who the program serves, who can apply for grants under the program and what steps states must take to be eligible, what home visiting models can be funded by states, what requirements program models must meet, evidence models that the Department of Health and Human Services has identified or is considering, how states must track program effectiveness, and how program effectiveness will be judged.

Contact: Children's Defense Fund, 25 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 628-8787 Secondary Telephone: (800) 233-1200 E-mail: cdfinfo@childrensdefense.org Web Site: http://www.childrensdefense.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Mothers, Eligibility, Families, Financing, Grants, Home visiting, Infants, Young children, Legislation, Low income groups, State programs

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Coffee-Borden B, Paulsell D. 2010. Recruiting and training home visitors for evidence-based home visiting (EBHV): Experiences of EBHV grantees. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 9 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment; brief 2)

Annotation: This brief summarizes lessons about recruiting and training home visitors for evidence-based programs from grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment grantee cluster. The brief provides an overview of strategies that agencies that were implementing home visiting programs employed to recruit and train home visitors as well as of the challenges they faced and lessons learned.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Grants, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Prevention, Programs, Recruitment, Training

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Coffee-Borden B, Paulsell D. 2010. Supporting home visitors in evidence-based programs: Experiences of EBHV grantees. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 9 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment; brief 4)

Annotation: This brief, which is fourth in a series, summarizes experiences supporting and supervising home visitors working in evidence-based programs affiliated with grantees participating in the Children’s Bureau’s Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting (EBHV) to Prevent Child Maltreatment initiative. The brief discusses implementing agencies’ experiences cultivating organizational support, providing supportive supervision, and building community partnerships in the context of implementing one or more of the national home-visiting models selected by the EBHV grantees and their partners. A companion brief describing EBHV grantees’ experiences with recruiting, hiring, and training home visitors is available. This brief discusses cultivating organizations support for home visitors, supervision in evidence-based home-visiting programs, and supporting home visitors through community partnerships.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Communities, Home visiting, Initiatives, Prevention, Programs, Supervision

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Colorado Department of Health and Environment, Maternal and Child Health Program. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Statewide needs assessment—Colorado. [Denver, CO]: Colorado Department of Health and Environment, Maternal and Child Health Program, 63 pp.

Annotation: This assessment is Colorado's response to the legislative requirement for receiving FY 2010 Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program funding. This funding is available through the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Grant program, which is part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010. The program is intended to help states respond to the needs of children and families in communities at risk in order to improve health and developmental outcomes for children through the implementation of evidence-based home visitation programs. Topics include a data report, quality and capacity of existing early childhood home visiting initiatives/programs in the state, and state capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services to individuals and families in need.

Contact: Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, 4300 Cherry Creek Drive South, Denver, CO 80246-1530, Telephone: (303) 692-2000 Secondary Telephone: (800) 886-7689 Fax: (303) 782-5576 E-mail: cdphe.information@state.co.us Web Site: http://www.colorado.gov/cs/Satellite/CDPHE-Main/CBON/1251583470000 Available from the website.

Keywords: Legislation, Access to health care, Child health, Colorado, Counseling, Early childhood development, Family support services, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Initiatives, Legislation, Low income groups, Needs assessment, Prevention, State grants, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse, Treatment

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Connecticut Home Visiting Needs Assessment Group. 2010. Statewide needs assessment for Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Programs: Connecticut. [Hartford, CT]: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 133 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides information about maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting in Connecticut. The report discusses at-risk communities' need for home visiting services; home visiting services in Connecticut; the status of Connecticut's maternal, infant, and early childhood service system; and the statewide and at-risk community data report. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Connecticut Department of Public Health, 410 Capitol Avenue, Hartford, CT 06134-0308, Telephone: (860) 509-8000 E-mail: webmaster.dph@po.state.ct.us Web Site: http://www.ct.gov/dph Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Connecticut, Families, Health services, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant health, Needs assessment, State programs, Women's health

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Daro D. 2010. Replicating evidence-based home visiting models: A framework for assessing fidelity. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 10 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment; brief 3)

Annotation: This brief, which is the third in a series of reports on the fidelity-monitoring system that Mathematic Policy Research and Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago developed for the cross-site evaluation of the Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment initiative. The brief provides a set of indicators that state planners can use in crafting their own fidelity-monitoring systems and assessing the implementation of home visiting models across different communities. The brief also defines fidelity and provides a framework for assessing it.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Communities, Evaluation, Home visiting, Initiatives, Prevention

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Family Violence Prevention Fund. 2010. Realizing the promise of home visitation: Addressing domestic violence and child maltreatment—A guide for policymakers. San Francisco, CA: Family Violence Prevention Fund, 27 pp.

Annotation: This issue brief is intended to help policymakers and advocates build a strong national policy framework to maximize the effectiveness and reach of early childhood home-visiting programs. More specifically, it is meant to ensure that federal home-visiting policies directly address the needs of mothers and children who are experiencing or at risk of experiencing domestic violence, the link between domestic violence and child abuse and neglect, and the impact of domestic violence on the health and well-being of children and families. The brief also provides an overview of home visiting and presents promising home-visiting programs.

Contact: Futures Without Violence, 100 Montgomery Street, The Presidio, San Francisco, CA 94129-1718, Telephone: (415) 678-5500 Fax: (415) 529-2930 E-mail: info@futureswithoutviolence.org Web Site: http://futureswithoutviolence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child health, Child neglect, Domestic violence, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, High risk infants, High risk mothers, Home visiting, Infants, Model programs, Public policy, Women's health, Young children

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Florida Department of Health. 2010. Florida's maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting needs assessment. [Tallahassee, FL]: Florida Department of Health, 238 pp.

Annotation: This 5-year needs assessment for Florida's maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program provides an overview of the impact of needs assessments, offers a statewide data report and discussion, and discusses defining communities in need, identifying Florida counties in need, quality and capacity of existing home visiting programs, Florida's substance abuse program, and a summary of the needs-assessment results.

Contact: Florida Department of Health, 4052 Bald Cypress Way, Tallahassee, FL 32399, Telephone: (850) 245-4147 Fax: (850) 487-4574 Web Site: http://www.doh.state.fl.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Florida, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Needs assessment, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse prevention programs, Women's heath, Young children

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Grantmakers in Health. 2010. Home visiting: Giving parents and children an early boost. Washington, DC: Grantmakers in Health, 2 pp. (Issue focus)

Annotation: This issue brief discusses facets of home visiting programs, benefits and challenges of these programs, provides examples of how health funders have supported programs to date, and describes opportunities for continuing support for these efforts. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Grantmakers In Health, 1100 Connecticut Avenue, N.W., Suite 1200, Washington, DC 20036-4101, Telephone: (202) 452-8331 Fax: (202) 452-8340 Web Site: http://www.gih.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Family support services, Home visiting, Program descriptions

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Guernsey L. 2010. What's next in expansion of home visitation. Washington, DC: New America Foundation,

Annotation: This webcast, held on April 30, 2010, focused on the impact of home visiting programs, scaling up, and health care reform.

Contact: New America Foundation, 1899 L Street, N.W., Suite 400, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 986-2700 Fax: (202) 986-3696 Web Site: http://www.newamerica.net Available from the website.

Keywords: Low income groups, Child health, Costs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Families, Financing, Health care reform, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Infants, Mothers, Pregnant women, Programs, Research, Young children

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Hale N, Shull K, Maletic A, Wilson R, Kraeff C. 2010. South Carolina evidence based home visiting needs assessment. (Columbia, SC): South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Title V Program, 145 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment for South Carolina provides background information; discusses the assessment process; provides a statewide data report, a definition of community, and a data report of each at-risk community; and discusses the quality and capacity of existing programs and the state's capacity for substance abuse treatment and counseling services.

Contact: South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, 2600 Bull Street, Columbia, SC 29201, Telephone: (803) 898-3432 Fax: (803) 898-3323 E-mail: form on Web site Web Site: http://www.scdhec.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, High risk groups, Infant mortality, Needs assessment, Poverty, South Carolina, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse prevention programs, Substance abuse treatment, Underserved communities

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Hallgren K, Boller K, Paulsell D. 2010. Better beginnings: Partnering with families for early learning home visit observations. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of observations conducted by Mathematica Policy Research of the newly-designed home visiting program called Partnering with Families for Early Learning (PFEL). The primary goal of the observations, conducted between fall 2008 and summer 2009, was to provide feedback about the content and quality of PFEL program visits to home visiting teams in White Center (outside Seattle) and East Yakima (in central Washington). A secondary goal was to pilot the observation measures employed for their potential usefulness in assessing implementation in future evaluations of PFEL. This brief provides an overview of the observation instruments and describes the content and quality of the observed PFEL home visits.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: , Early childhood education, Home visiting, Model programs, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parent participation, Parent support services, Service delivery systems

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Hallgren K, Paulsell D, Del Grosso P. 2010. Better beginnings: Developing home-based early learning systems in East Yakima and White Center. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief summarizes the progress made by two Washington-state communities in developing home-based early learning (HBEL) services. Based on data collected by Mathematica during site visits in 2008 and 2009, the brief summaries the need for HBEL and the implementation of services during the first year in White Center (outside of Seattle) and East Yakima (in central Washington). It explains how the communities selected programs to implement and how they prepared for service delivery. It then describes the implementation of two established home visiting models (Nurse Family Partnership and Parents as Teachers) and the piloting of a newly developed model(Partnering with Families for Early Learning). The brief concludes by highlighting key lessons learned and next steps for ongoing development of the HBEL service delivery system.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Early childhood education, Home visiting, Model programs, Parent child relations, Parent education, Parent participation, Parent support services, Service delivery systems, Washington

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Haskins R, Barnett WS (Eds.). 2010. Investing in young children: New directions in federal preschool and early childhood policy. Washington, DC: Center on Children and Families at Brookings; New Brunswick, NJ: National Institute for Early Education Research, 96 pp.

Annotation: This volume focuses on the issue of whether early childhood education programs boost child development and prepare children for school and proposes changes to improve the programs. The document contains contrasting papers on the success of Head Start, Early Head Start, and home visiting programs and on policies that could improve the programs. The volume discusses government spending on early childhood education programs, reviews the number of children enrolled in each type of program, reviews the papers on the three programs and an additional paper on program coordination, and recommends policies that could increase the returns generated by early childhood education programs.

Contact: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6058 Fax: (202) 797-2968 E-mail: ccf@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu/ccf.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Costs, Early Head Start, Early childhood education, Enrollment, Federal programs, Financing, Head Start, Home visiting, Program coordination, Public policy, School readiness

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Home Visiting Needs Assessment Workgroup. 2010. State of Oregon supplemental information request: Statewide needs assessment. Portland, OR: Oregon Department of Human Services, 66 pp.

Annotation: This report provides statewide data for Oregon in the following categories: premature birth, low-birthweight infants, infant mortality, poverty, crime, domestic violence, school dropout rates, substance abuse, unemployment, child maltreatment, and other indicators of at-risk prenatal, maternal, newborn, or child health. County-level data for the same categories is also provided, and information on the selection process of a unit of analysis is offered. The report also includes information about the quality and capacity of Oregon's existing home-visiting programs and the state's capacity for providing substance abuse treatment. A narrative summary of needs-assessment results concludes the report.

Contact: Oregon Department of Human Services, Maternal and Child Health Section, 800 N.E. Oregon Street, Suite 825, Portland, OR 97232, Telephone: (971) 673-0252 Secondary Telephone: (971) 673-0372 Fax: (971) 673-0240 E-mail: dhs.info@state.or.us Web Site: http://public.health.oregon.gov/PHD/Directory/Pages/program.aspx?pid=25 Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Child maltreatment, Crime, Domestic violence, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant health, Infant mortality, Low birthweight infants, Needs assessment, Oregon Preterm birth, Poverty, Reproductive health, School dropouts, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse, Treatment, Unemployment, Women's health

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Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. 2010. Idaho's ACA Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program needs assessment [narrative]. [Boise, ID]: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This 2010 needs assessment for Idaho's maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program provides a statewide data report, describes the unit selected as "community," provide a data report for each at-risk community, discusses the quality and capacity of existing programs in at-risk communities, discusses capacity for providing substance-abuse treatment and counseling services in at-risk communities, and provides a summary of needs-assessment results.

Contact: Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, P.O. Box 83720, 450 West State Street, Boise, ID 83720-0036, Telephone: (800) 926-2588 Secondary Telephone: (208) 334-5500 Web Site: http://www.healthandwelfare.idaho.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: High risk groups, Communities, Counseling, Data, Families, Health care reform, Home visiting, Idaho, Infants, Needs assessment, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Pregnant women, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment, Young children

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Kahn J, Moore KA. 2010. What works for home visiting programs: Lessons from experimental evaluations of programs and interventions. Washington, DC: Child Trends, 33 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This synthesis examines findings from 66 studies that implemented random assignment intent-to-treat experimental evaluations of programs that include home visiting as a program component. Topics include programs that work as well as the intervention strategies that contribute to program success. Analyses are segmented by the target population served (birth to age 3, ages 4-5, 6-11, and 12-17).

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Children, Home visiting, Literature reviews, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Studies

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Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Family Health . 2010. Needs assessment for maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting program. Topeka, KS: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Family Health , 82 pp.

Annotation: This mandatory document is the first step in the state of Kansas' multi-step process to identify high risk communities for home visiting services and assess the state's capacity to provide services in high risk communities. The document contains information that is supplemental to the Kansas grant under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. Included are community and state data reports; a report on the quality and capacity of existing home visiting programs; a report on the state capacity to provide substance use disorder treatment services; and a summary of results and plans to address unmet needs. The document describes the Kansas program as one that envisions child development within socio-ecological and life course development frameworks.

Contact: Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau for Children, Youth, and Families, 1000 S.W. Jackson, Suite 220, Topeka, KS 66612-1274, Telephone: (785) 291-3368 Secondary Telephone: (800) 332-6262 Web Site: http://www.kdheks.gov/bfh/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: High risk groups, Home visiting, Kansas, Legislation, Life course, Models, Needs assessment, State MCH programs

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Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Family Health Administration. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infants, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Maryland's statewide needs assessment. Baltimore, MD: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Family Health Administration, 25 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This needs-assessment supplemental information report for Maryland provides information about key health indicators in the state, such as infant mortality and related risk factors and child health, and discusses Maryland's plans to build on previous home visiting programs and employ new home visiting strategies. The report describes Maryland's approach to conducting the preliminary home visiting needs assessment to identify communities at risk through analysis of data and assessment of capacity. Topics include the needs assessment process, findings, communities at risk, and capacity for providing substance abuse treatment.

Contact: Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, Maternal and Child Health Bureau, 201 West Preston Street, Third Floor, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 767-5596 Fax: (410) 333-5233 E-mail: dhmh.mchb@maryland.gov Web Site: http://phpa.dhmh.maryland.gov/mch/SitePages/contact.aspx Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infant death, Infant health, Low income groups, Maryland, Needs assessment, Poverty, State programs, Substance abuse treatment services

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Minnesota Department of Health, Commissioner's Office. 2010. Family Home Visiting Program: Report to the Minnesota Legislature 2010. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, 46 pp.

Annotation: This report highlights the activities and accomplishments of the state of Minnesota's Family Home Visiting Program during 2008-2009. it describes the statutory requirements and goals of the state program and its development in the areas of targeted home visiting plans, training, and technical assistance. Also included are a description of the evaluation plan and framework; data collection and preliminary evaluation results; promotion of community partnerships and collaborations; target populations; and outcome and performance measures. The appendices include the full text of the revised 2007 Minnesota Family Home Visiting Program Statute; a summary of Tribal government family home visiting plans; community partnerships; training and technical assistance activities; a summary of populations served; and a data collection form.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Data collection, Evaluation, Home visiting, Minnesota, Reports, State legislation, State programs

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Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program needs assessment. Jefferson City, MO: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 181 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment report discusses a statewide data report for Missouri, identification of at-risk communities, data reports for each of the top 10 at-risk counties, quality and capacity of existing programs and initiatives for early childhood home visiting, and the state's capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services.

Contact: Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services, 1730 East Elm, P.O. Box 570, Jefferson City, MO 65102-0570, Telephone: (573) 751-6400 Fax: (573) 751-6041 E-mail: info@dhss.mo.gov Web Site: http://www.dhss.mo.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Counseling, Families, Initiatives, Health services, High risk children, High risk infants, Home visiting, Infant health, Missouri, Needs assessment, State programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse treatment, Women's health

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National Association of County and City Health Officials . 2010. A compendium of local heath department home visitation program case studies. Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 69 pp.

Annotation: This compendium highlights local health department (LHD) home visiting programs (HVPs). The compendium comprises eight case studies developed from information obtained in interviews with LHDs. Each program summary includes information about community dynamics; a program description (staffing and training, participants and home visits, tools and resources); evaluation; community partnerships and resource sharing; successes and challenges; recommendations; future plans; and program contact. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Association of County and City Health Officials , 1100 17th Street, N.W., Seventh Floor, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 783-5550 Fax: (202) 783-1583 E-mail: info@naccho.org Web Site: http://www.naccho.org Available from the website (requires registration). Document Number: NA357PDF.

Keywords: Case studies, Community based services, Community coordination, Community programs, Home visiting, Local programs, Program descriptions, Program development, Program improvement, Program planning

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National Healthy Start Association. 2010. Federal Healthy Start Initiative: A national network for effective home visitation and family support services. Washington, DC: National Healthy Start Association, 19 pp.

Annotation: This white paper highlights the strengths and competencies of the federal Healthy Start Initiative. It was produced in response to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act designed to strengthen and approve home visiting programs, improve service coordination for at-risk communities, and identify and provide comprehensive evidence-based home visiting services to families that reside in at-risk communities. The paper provides a brief history of the Healthy Start Initiative, an overview of the Healthy Start network and core services, key attributes of the Healthy Start home visitation model, Healthy Start model programs, and implications for health reform. A map indicating Healthy Start locations in the United States and a logic model for national evaluation of Healthy Start programs are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Healthy Start Association, 1411 K Street, NW, Suite 1350, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 296-2195 Fax: (202) 296-2197 E-mail: info@nationalhealthystart.org Web Site: http://www.healthystartassoc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Federal programs, Health care reform, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Infant mortality, Model programs, Prevention programs

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National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation. 2010. Investing in early childhood: Partnerships to implement home visiting programs. Washington, DC: National Institute for Health Care Management Research and Educational Foundation,

Annotation: This webinar, held on October 26, 2010, brought together public and private sector stakeholders to explore how partnering to invest in early childhood reaps benefits for children and families and will ultimately benefit all of society. Presenters included Dr. Audrey Yowell, Health Resources and Services Administration's Maternal and Child Health Bureau; Veronica Creech and Peggy Hill, Nurse-Family Partnership; and Katie Eyes, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina Foundation. Archived content includes the agenda, speaker biographies, presentations, evaluation, and additional resources. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Institute for Health Care Management Foundation, 1225 19th Street, N.W., Suite 710, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 296-4426 Fax: (202) 296-4319 E-mail: http://www.nihcm.org/contact Web Site: http://www.nihcm.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood, Home visiting, Multimedia, Public private partnerships

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Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health. 2010. Nebraska home visiting survey. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, 9 pp.

Annotation: This home visiting survey for providers is part of the application by the Nebraska Department of Health & Human Services, Division of Public Health, for federal funds to expand home visiting in the state. The survey is designed to provide a brief update of resources and needs in Nebraska communities.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us

Keywords: Communities, Financing, Home visiting, Nebraska, Needs assessments, State programs, State surveys

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Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Nebraska ACA Home Visiting Program. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: Supplemental information request for the submission of statewide needs assessment. [Lincoln, NE]: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health, 55 pp.

Annotation: This 2010 survey of Nebraska's home visiting program is intended to gather information on existing services as part of the program's application for federal funds to expand home visiting in the state. Earlier versions of the survey were conducted in 2006 and 2007. The survey is designed to provide an update of resources and needs in Nebraska communities.

Contact: Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, P.O. Box 95026, Lincoln, NE 68509-5026, Telephone: (402) 471-3121 E-mail: dhhs.helpline@nebraska.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.state.ne.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Surveys, Communities, Financing, Health care reform, Home visiting, Nebraska, Needs assessment, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State programs

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New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health. 2010. Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program: New Hampshire statewide needs assessment. [Concord, NH]: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health, 59 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides a data analysis and capacity assessment of home visiting services in the state of New Hampshire. It includes an overview of current home visiting programs, indicating where there are disparities and gaps and identifying populations in need of additional services. The data analysis is based on the Social Determinants in Health construct, where indicators used to assess risk included the following: premature births, low birth weight, infant mortality, poverty, crime, domestic violence, child maltreatment, school dropout rates, substance abuse, and employment, to determine communities at higher risk. The report concludes with a narrative summary of the needs assessment results, including how the state will address unmet needs.

Contact: New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services, Maternal and Child Health, 29 Hazen Drive, Concord, NH 03301, Telephone: (603) 271-4517 Secondary Telephone: (800) 852-3345, x4517 Fax: (603) 271-4519 Web Site: http://www.dhhs.nh.gov/dphs/bchs/mch/index.htm Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Needs assessment, New Hampshire, Reports, State MCH programs

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North Dakota Department of Health. 2010. Affordable Care Act (ACA) Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program needs assessment: Supplemental information request for the submission of the statewide needs assessment. Bismarck, ND: North Dakota Department of Health, 86 pp.

Annotation: This needs assessment offers an overview of key performance indicators used to identify communities in greatest need of a home visiting program in North Dakota. After describing the approach taken and the framework used, the needs assessment discusses the demographics in the state of North Dakota, including population shifts between 1870 and 2009; looks at economic conditions (including the labor force, wages, and poverty levels); shifting household composition, births (including preterm and low birthweight), and infant mortality. The assessment also looks at domestic violence, child maltreatment, physical and sexual violence, high school dropout levels, substance abuse (including drug and tobacco use), and crime. Included is a review of the North Dakota Head Start needs assessment and a detailed summary of findings. Tables and maps compare findings across counties and regions.

Contact: North Dakota Department of Health, 600 East Boulevard Avenue, Bismarck, ND 58505, Telephone: (701) 328-2372 Fax: (701) 328-4727 Web Site: http://www.ndhealth.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Women's health, Adolescent health, Child health, Demography, Health care reform, Home visiting, Measures, Needs assessment, North Dakota, Outcome evaluation, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, State MCH programs

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Nurse-Family Partnership. 2010. Public-private partnerships for greater impact on maternal and child health outcomes: Nurse-Family Partnership and "the Blues" in the Carolinas. Denver, CO: Nurse-Family Partnership, 22 pp.

Annotation: This power point presentation explains how the Nurse Family Partnership's home visitation program can improve maternal and child health outcomes. It provides an overview of the Nurse Family Partnership (NFP) program; discusses research findings about its effectiveness in terms of health outcomes and monetary benefits; and looks at NFP program implementation and outcomes in the states of North Carolina and South Carolina. The presentation also addresses new federal funding for state home visitation programs and discusses emerging issues and trends related to improved maternal and child health outcomes. The various presenters are from the Nurse Family Partnership and Blue Cross Blue Shield.

Contact: Nurse-Family Partnership, 1900 Grant Street, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80203, Telephone: (303) 327-4240 Secondary Telephone: (866) 864-5226 Fax: (303) 327-4260 E-mail: info@nursefamilypartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence, Families, Family centered services, Home visiting, MCH programs, North Carolina, Nurse practitioners, Outcome evaluation, South Carolina, State programs

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Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Early Intervention Services. 2010. Help Me Grow . Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health, Bureau of Early Intervention Services,

Annotation: This web site provides information for professionals and for clients of Ohio's Help Me Grow program, which provides health and developmental services for pregnant women and young children so children start school healthy and ready to learn. Parent and caregiver resources include topics on wellness, nutrition, children with special needs, the infant hearing program, school readiness, and safety. Resources include a parents index, information packets, county resources, a glossary of terms, frequently asked questions about the program, parents rights, and links for more information. Professional resources on the web site include training and development; program announcements; the infant hearing program; laws, regulations, and policies, the Early Track Data System, and frequently asked questions. Additional information is provided on grants, county program providers, and the early intervention systems of payment. A section for policies is available on a range of topics including those relevant for all, Part C, and home visitation. An online form is available for submitting information to obtain program referrals for those living in Ohio.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Consumer education materials, Early intervention programs, Health services delivery, Hearing screening, Home visiting, Infant health, Ohio, Screening, State programs

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Ohio Department of Health, Help Me Grow Home Visiting Program. 2010. Home visiting program manual. Columbus, OH: Ohio Department of Health,

Annotation: This web page provides links to materials related to the Help Me Grow Home Visiting Program, including narrative sections fro the program manual, brochures, and forms. Local program contact information is also provided.

Contact: Ohio Department of Health, 246 North High Street, Columbus, OH 43215, Telephone: (614) 466-3543 Web Site: http://www.odh.ohio.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Families, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Ohio, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, State programs

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Paulsell D, Coffee-Borden B. 2010. Assessing the need for evidence-based home visiting (EBHV): Experiences of EBHV grantees. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research; [Chicago, IL]: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 49 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment; brief 1)

Annotation: This brief provides information about how grantees participating in the Children's Bureau's Supporting Evidence-Based Home Visiting to Prevent Child Maltreatment grantee cluster prepared needs assessments to to plan for implementing or expanding grant-related evidence-based home visiting services. The brief discusses how grantees planned the assessments and collected the data, as well as facilitators and barriers to carrying out the assessments. It also describes lesson that grantees identified.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Child maltreatment, Evidence, Federal programs, Grants, Home visiting, Prevention

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Pew Center on the States. 2010. State home visiting programs and investments, FY10. [Washington, DC]: Pew Center on the States, 10 pp.

Annotation: This chart provides a list of state home visiting programs and investment for FY2010. For each program, the chart lists the state in which it is located, the level of funding, administering agency, source of funds, and models used.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Financing, Home visiting, Models, State programs

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Pew Center on the States. 2010. The case for home visiting: Strong families start with a solid foundation. Washington, DC: Pew Center on the States, 4 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief describes the benefits of a home visiting program in providing information and services to new parents and families throughout pregnancy and their child's first three years. Topics include the importance of prenatal care, safe and stable housing, counseling for tobacco or substance abuse, domestic violence prevention, as well as advice on building positive, loving relationships with their children.

Contact: Pew State and Consumer Initiatives, 901 E Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004-2008, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 Fax: (202) 552-2299 E-mail: pcs-feedback@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewstates.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Counseling, Domestic violence, Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Parent child relations, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Substance abuse prevention

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Pew Charitable Trusts, Pew Center on the States. 2010. Federal home visiting funding: Implications for state home visiting investments and initiatives. [Philadelphia, PA]: Pew Charitable Trusts, Pew Center on the States, 28 pp.

Annotation: These printed PowerPoint presentation slides are from an April 13, 2010 webinar introducing the Pew home visiting campaign, whose goal is to foster smart state investments in quality, voluntary home-based programs for new and expectant families. It reviews the current state of state home visiting investments, provides a brief overview of the federal home visiting provisions in Public Law No. 111-148, assesses states' concerns and issues to inform/influence the federal regulatory process of the new program, and explores possible technical support needs of states to compete successfully for federal home visiting funds.

Contact: Pew Charitable Trusts, One Commerce Square, 2005 Market Street, Suite 1700, Philadelphia, PA 19103-7077, Telephone: (215) 575-9050 Fax: (215) 575-4939 E-mail: info@pewtrusts.org Web Site: http://www.pewtrusts.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention, Families, Federal programs, Home visiting, Legislation, Pregnant women, State programs

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Schreiber L. 2010. Key components of a successful early childhood home visitation system: A self-assessment tool for states. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 12 pp.

Annotation: This tool is designed to help states define the home visiting system, assess capacity, and prioritize areas for improvement. The document provides a series of templates for conducting an inventory of existing programs; identifying service gaps; collecting, analyzing, and monitoring data; ensuring model fidelity and a high-quality system of services; maintaining a skilled and competent work force and providing technical assistance; partnering and collaborating with other early childhood services; creating public and political will; administering and funding the home visitation system; and sustaining support. Templates for adding state-specific components and determining priority areas for improvement are included. Tips for the using the tool are also provided.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Assessment, Home visiting, Program improvement, Service delivery system, State programs

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Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services. 2010. Texas home visiting needs assessment for the Affordable Care Act Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. [Austin, TX]: Texas Department of State Health Services, Division of Family and Community Health Services, 83 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This needs assessment provides information about home visiting needs in Texas. The document includes background information about the state and discusses the process for conducting the assessment, the statewide and at-risk communities data report, the quality and capacity of existing home visiting initiatives in Texas, partner agency infrastructure for early childhood services, existing home visiting initiatives, and the quality and capacity of existing substance abuse treatment and counseling services in Texas.

Contact: Texas Department of State Health Services, 1100 West 49th Street, Austin, TX 78756, Telephone: (512) 458-7111 Secondary Telephone: (512) 458-7708 Fax: (512) 458-7750 Web Site: http://www.dshs.state.tx.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Families, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Maternal health services, Mental health services, Services, State MCH programs, Statistical data, Substance abuse treatment services, Texas, Needs assessment, Young children

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U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration and U.S. Administration for Children and Families. 2010. Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, 5 files.

Annotation: This website contains an archived webinar providing an overview of the Maternal, Infant, and Early Childhood Home Visiting Program that guides viewers through the first Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), released on June 10, 2010. The program, created as part of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (Affordable Care Act or ACA) (P.L. 111-148), is administered by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), in collaboration with the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to promote healthy child development and improved maternal and child health outcomes. Questions and answers follow the presentations. Presentation slides, transcripts, and an audio file are also available on the website.

Contact: U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (888) 275-4772 Secondary Telephone: (877) 464-4772 Fax: (301) 443-1246 E-mail: ask@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Child health, Federal programs, Home visiting, Maternal health, Multimedia

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[Virginia Department of Health]. 2010. Commonwealth of Virginia home visiting needs assessment. [Richmond, VA]: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report was compiled by the state of Virginia in response to section 511 of Title V of the Social Security Act which requires that all states conduct a statewide home visiting needs assessment that (1) Identifies communities at risk for poor health outcomes among mothers, infants, children, and adolescents; (2) describes the quality and capacity of existing programs or initiatives for early childhood home visitation in the state; and (3) addresses the state's capacity for providing substance abuse treatment and counseling services to individuals and families in need of such treatment or services. The assessment reports on rates of poverty, infant and fetal mortality, low birth weight, maternal mortality, racial and ethnic birth disparities, teen births, maternal depression, well child care, fiscal health, crime, domestic violence, high school dropout, substance abuse, illicit drug use, prenatal substance abuse exposure, unemployment, child maltreatment, and early intervention in the state of Virginia. Indicators used to assess risk across the state are provided in table format.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, VA , Telephone: 540-568-5251 Fax: 540-568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconfortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Needs assessment, Reports, State MCH programs, Virginia

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Walker KE, Daly RM, McMaken J, Pouncy H, with Billings J. 2010. Early outcomes for programs and families in Children's Futures. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures, 71 pp.

Annotation: This report, which is the third of several about Children's Futures (a multi-year community-change initiative based in Trenton, New Jersey), examines programmatic achievement and outcomes for Trenton's families at the end of the initiative's first 5 years and addresses issues related to cost, partnership, and development of future sustainability. In particular, the report addresses three types of programs—home visiting, training to improve preventive medical care, and child care quality-improvement efforts.

Contact: Public/Private Ventures, 2000 Market Street, Suite 600, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 557-4400 Secondary Telephone: (215) 557-4411 Fax: (215) 557-4469 E-mail: publications@ppv.org Web Site: http://www.ppv.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Infants, Child care, Child health, Children, Community programs, Costs, Evaluation, Families, Health care, Home visiting, Initiatives, Low income groups, New Jersey, Prevention, Programs

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Washington State Department of Health. 2010. Home visiting needs assessment. [Olympia, WA]: Washington State Department of Health, 3 files.

Annotation: This needs assessment was conducted by the Washington State Department of Health as outlined in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and its guidance and includes information about home visiting and substance abuse treatment capacity in the state. The assessment provides an overview of the state's demographics and identifies 32 geographic areas and five racial/ethnic groups as communities at risk based on scores derived using a total of fifteen indicators. These include preterm birth, low birth weight, infant mortality, unemployment, poverty, crime, domestic violence, high school drop out, child maltreatment, substance use, 10th grade illicit drug use, 10th grade binge drinking, late or no prenatal care, teen births, and 3rd grade reading level. The methods used to create and summarize the risk scores are described in detail. Information on the state's home visiting programs and lists of substance abuse treatment providers and their services (organized by county) are included in the appendices.

Contact: Washington State Department of Health, P.O. Box 47890, Olympia, WA 98504-7890, Telephone: (800) 525-0127 Secondary Telephone: (360) 236-4030 Web Site: http://www.doh.wa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Needs assessment, Reports, State MCH programs, Substance abuse treatment, Washington

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Zero To Three. 2010. Successful early childhood home visitation state systems. Washington, DC: Zero to Three,

Annotation: This webinar provides an overview of the new home visitation legislation process and the application process for funding. It includes a panel discussion with four model states (Colorado, New Jersey, Virginia, and Washington); an update from the Pew Center on its state home visiting initiatve; and a description of Zero to Three's new self-assessment tool. Deescriptions of the model state systems and a copy of the assessment tool can be downloaded from the webinar's web site.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal legislation, Financing, Health care reform, Home visiting, State programs

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Brunner W, Pies C. [2009] (ca.). Intensive home visiting programs: Implications for California counties. Martinez, CA: Contra Costa County Health Services, Public Health Division, 7 pp.

Annotation: To understand how home visiting programs can fit into a broader framework of services for families, children, and adolescents, this paper examines three models of intensive home visiting that have been implemented in the United Sates to date, reviews the outcomes from the data collected by these programs, and makes several recommendations for the strategic implementation of intensive home visiting programs in local counties in California.

Contact: Contra Costa County Health Services, Public Health Division, 50 Douglas Drive, Martinez, CA 94553, Telephone: (925) 313-6712 Fax: (925) 313-6712 Web Site: http://www.cchealth.org/groups/public_health/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, California, Children, Families, Health services, Home visiting, Program evaluation, Service integration, Social services, State programs

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AHRQ Health Care Innovations Exchange. [2009]. Innovation profile: Home visits using reflective approach improve functional health literacy among low-income pregnant women and new parents. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report profiles the LIfe Skills Outcomes program, a home-visitation program serving low-income, ethnically diverse pregnant women and new parents. The program uses a reflective approach and easy-to-understand pregnancy and child care guides to improve functional health literacy. The report focuses on the program's client population, program activities, results, how results were accomplished, resources used and skills needed, and information about replicating and sustaining the program's approach.

Contact: U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 540 Gaither Road, Suite 2000, Rockville, MD 20850, Telephone: (301) 427-1104 Secondary Telephone: (800) 358-9295 Web Site: http://www.ahrq.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Ethnic groups, Health literacy, Home visiting, Infants, Life skills, Low income groups, Low literacy, Parents, Pregnant women

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Growing Great Kids. [2009]. Growing Great Kids for preschoolers: Curriculum and training seminars. Altadena, CA: Growing Great Kids,

Annotation: This Web site describes an interactive curriculum geared toward optimizing developmental outcomes for preschool children (ages 3-5). The curriculum provides parents, home visitors, and preschool teachers with the knowledge and skills needed to support children in forming strong self-esteem, critical and creative thinking capabilities, cooperative peer relationships, age-appropriate impulse control, habits foundational to healthy lifestyles, and social and academic building blocks for school success. The curriculum can be used with groups of children in center- or home-based programs, with parents and children during home visits, in parent-education groups, and for training preschool teachers and child care providers. The curriculum includes a manual with 24 parent- and teacher-education modules, a manual with child development activities for 3-year-olds, and a manual with child-development activities for 4- and 5-year-olds. Curriculum training is also provided.

Contact: Great Kids Inc., 100 North 72 Avenue, Suite 200 , Wausau, WI 54401 , Telephone: 800-906-5581 Secondary Telephone: 626-345-0684 E-mail: jeang@greatkidsinc.net Web Site: http://www.greatkidsinc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Cognitive development, Curricula, Early childhood development, Home visiting, Parenting skills, Relationships, School readiness, Training

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Growing Great Kids. [2009]. Growing Great Kids: Prenantal to 36 months—An interactive parenting and child development curriculum and a staff development program. Altadena, CA: Growing Great Kids,

Annotation: This Web site offers an interactive, family-support, parenting, and child-development curriculum. The curriculum is intended for home-visiting programs for parents of young children, community organizations and businesses offering parenting classes, faith-based organizations, health organizations, and child care providers. The curriculum supports the development of nurturing and empathetic parent-child relationships for infants and children from birth through age 3. It focuses on child development and health, provision of care, parenting concerns, and dynamics of parent-child and family relationships. Modules address basic care, social and emotional development, cues and communication, physical and brain development, and play and stimulation. The curriculum includes handouts for parents (available in English and Spanish), unit certificates of completion for parents, and documentation records specific to each module. Curriculum training is also provided.

Contact: Great Kids Inc., 100 North 72 Avenue, Suite 200 , Wausau, WI 54401 , Telephone: 800-906-5581 Secondary Telephone: 626-345-0684 E-mail: jeang@greatkidsinc.net Web Site: http://www.greatkidsinc.org Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Child health, Cognitive development, Communication, Curricula, Early childhood development, Families, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Infant stimulation, Parent child relations, Parenting skills, Physical development, Play

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Virginia Home Visiting Consortium. [2009]. Virginia home visiting logic model. [Richmond, VA: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium], 1 p.

Annotation: This fact sheet summarizes the model for developing and implementing the home visiting program in Virginia. It outlines resources/programs, system strategies for success, and goals for audiences and services.

Contact: Virginia Home Visiting Consortium, James Madison University, The Institute for Innovation in Health and Human Services, VA , Telephone: 540-568-5251 Fax: 540-568-6409 E-mail: homevisitingconfortium.jmu.edu Web Site: http://www.homevisitingva.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Health promotion, Home care services, Home visiting, Infants, Models, Parent support services, Pregnant women, State programs, Strategic plans, Virginia, Young children

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Astuto J, Allen L. 2009. Home visitation and young children: An approach worth investing in?. Social Policy Report 23(4):1-22,

Annotation: This report focuses on home visitation as an early childhood intervention strategy in the United States. It discusses the history of home visitation, reviews the literature on the effectiveness of nationally recognized home visitation interventions, and discusses the limitations of the existing empirical base as well as the lessons learned. The report concludes with considerations for practice, research, and policy in the field of home visitation. Comparative descriptions of key national home visiting models; a listing of the components of home visiting that influence treatment adherence; and a discussion of barriers to policy implementation are included.

Contact: Society for Research in Child Development, , 2950 South State Street, Suite 401, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, Telephone: (734) 926-0600 Fax: (734) 926-0601 E-mail: info@srcd.org Web Site: http://www.srcd.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Comparative analysis, Early intervention, High risk children, Home visiting, Infants, Literature reviews, Model programs, Policy development, Program evaluation, Young children

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CityMatCH and National Association of County and City Health Officials. 2009. Local health department home visitation programs: Improving health outcomes for children and families. Omaha, NE: CityMatCH; Washington, DC: National Association of County and City Health Officials, (Emerging issues in maternal and child health)

Annotation: This webcast, held on June 18, 2009, focuses on local health department home visiting programs, and in particular the nurse family partnership program. The webcast provides information on (1) general components of the partnership, (2) lesson learned from local health department program development and implementation, (3) strategies for continued evaluation and quality improvement, and (4) identifying potential sources of funding for implementing the program. The presenter was Peggy Hill, director of program development for the Nurse-Family Partnership National Service Office. A recording of the conference and PowerPoint slides are available. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: CityMatCH, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, 982170 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198-2170, Telephone: (402) 552-9500 E-mail: citymch@unmc.edu Web Site: http://www.citymatch.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Financing, Home visiting, Local MCH programs, Multimedia, Nurses, Programs, Visiting nurses

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Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. 2009. Early childhood home visitation program models: An objective summary of the evidence about which are effective. Washington, DC: Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 8 pp.

Annotation: This paper summarizes the findings from rigorous evaluations of six U.S. home visitation program models: Hawaii Healthy Start, Healthy Families New York, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Nurse Family partnership, Parents as Teachers, and Parent-Child Home Program. The paper includes brief descriptions of each of the home visitation programs and a summary of program evaluation studies and findings based on randomized trials.

Contact: Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 1725 I Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 683-8049 Fax: (202) 349-1137 Web Site: http://coalition4evidence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence-based medicine, Home visiting, Model programs, Program evaluation, Research reviews

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Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy. 2009. Early childhood home visitation: Effectiveness of a national initiative depends critically on adherence to rigorous evidence about "what works'. Washington, DC: Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 15 pp.

Annotation: This paper updates the Coalition for Evidence-based Policy's earlier evaluation summaries of widely-implemented U.S. home visitation program models. The updated paper provides brief program descriptions and summaries of evaluative studies for each of the following programs: Hawaii Healthy Start, Healthy Families New York, Healthy Families Alaska, Healthy Families San Diego, Home Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY), Nurse Family Partnership, Parents as Teachers, and Parent-Child Home Program. Also included are the following three Illustrative examples of promising program models in early-childhood home visitation and related areas: (1) Early Start (a New Zealand-based home visitation program); (2) Recovery Coaches for Substance-abusing Parentings; and (3) Triple P (Positive Parenting Program). Suggestions are provided for policy makers who are considering launching a national initiative to fund home visiting programs based on rigorous evidence of what works.

Contact: Coalition for Evidence-Based Policy, 1725 I Street, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20006, Telephone: (202) 683-8049 Fax: (202) 349-1137 Web Site: http://coalition4evidence.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evidence-based medicine, Home visiting, Model programs, Program evaluation, Research reviews

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Daro D. 2009. Embedding home visitation programs within a system of early childhood services. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall Center for Children, 5 pp. (Chapin Hall issue brief)

Annotation: This issue brief focuses on developing a knowledge base to guide the process of implementing a policy and research agenda to determine the best way to make use of home visitation to enhance the impact of early childhood intervention. The brief discusses key components of a system of early intervention services, opportunities and challenges to states and localities, and the importance of investing in home visitation.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention, Families, Financing, High risk groups, Home visiting, Infants, Local programs, Low income groups, Public policy, Research, State programs, Young children

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Del Grosso P, Daro D. 2009. Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantees: Summary of the planning year. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 49 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report describes planning for a cross-site evaluation of programs of 17 evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) grantees of the U.S. Children's Bureau. It describes the EBHV grantees, the home visiting models they are implementing, and their implementation plans. It then highlights key evaluation activities conducted during the planning year. Finally, it describes lessons learned and parameters for moving forward.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early intervention, Home visiting, MCH research, Model programs, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Research methodology

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DiLauro E. 2009. Reaching families where they live: Supporting parents and child development through home visiting. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 6 pp.

Annotation: This brief provides recommendations for policymakers to ensure that all families have access to high quality home visiting services as part of a comprehensive and coordinated support system that nurtures their child's healthy development. Contents include descriptions of national home visiting models serving infants, toddlers, and their families and research on the impacts each program has had on children and families.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child development services, Families, Family support services, Home visiting, Infants, Public policy, Service delivery systems, Toddlers

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[Early Head Start National Resource Center]. 2009. Home visiting play materials and EHS/infants and toddlers. [Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center], 3 pp. (Early Head Start tip sheet; no. 32)

Annotation: This tip sheet, which is intended to provide a basis for dialogue, clarification, and problem solving among Head Start personnel, technical assistance consultants, and grantees, offers information on what types of play materials can be used from the home to create a purposeful learning experience for infants and young children during a home visit. The tip sheet discusses considerations for materials that support discovery and learning and supporting development through commercial materials, lists questions to consider for planning and programming, and provides relevant Head Start performance standards.

Keywords: Early Childhood development, Early Head Start, Families, Head Start, Home visiting, Infant Development, Infants, Low income groups, Play, Program planning, Toys, Young children

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Haksins R, Paxson C, Brooks-Gunn J. 2009. Social science rising: A tale of evidence shaping public policy. Princeton, NJ: The Future of Children, Princeton University, 7 pp. (Policy brief)

Annotation: This policy brief discusses how rigorous social science evaluations of home-visiting programs can help policy makers make informed funding decisions based on evidence-based models. The brief discusses the evolution of the home-visitation legislation drafted under the Obama administration; lobbying efforts to expand the legislation to include funding for programs other than the Nurse-Family Partnership programs and other nurse home visiting models; and the potential challenges in selecting a single form of evaluation such as randomized clinical trials (RCTs) to determine which home visiting programs should receive federal funding. The brief discusses various types of home-visiting programs that serve children and families; how evidence of program effectiveness can be applied to public policy; and how lobbying efforts can present the possibilities for constructive compromise. It concludes by highlighting key issues related to the populations who will be served as a result of home-visiting program expansion.

Contact: Future of Children, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, Robertson Hall, Princeton, NJ 08544-1013, Telephone: (609) 258-2493 E-mail: http://www.futureofchildren.org/feedback2822/feedback.htm Web Site: http://www.futureofchildren.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Evidence, Home visiting, Policy development, Public policy, Social factors

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Hargreaves M, Paulsell D. 2009. Evaluating systems change efforts to support evidence-based home visiting: Concepts and methods. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 18 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report summarizes evaluation concepts and methods planned by recipients of 17 U.S. Children's Bureau-sponsored cooperative agreements to support the infrastructure needed for the high-quality implementation of existing evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs to prevent child maltreatment. It discusses the system-based evaluation approach and theory of change, EBHV infrastructure concepts, and system-based evaluation methods.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early intervention, Home visiting, MCH research, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Research methodology, Service delivery systems

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Hoffman E, Perrin TC. 2009. Extending home visiting to kinship caregivers and family, friend, and neighbor caregivers. Washington, DC: Center for Law and Social Policy, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report explores how home visiting can be responsive to children who spend significant time either in the care of kinship caregivers (i.e. grandparents and other relatives) when their parents are unable to provide care, or when family, friends, or neighbor (FFN) caregivers provide care for children so that their parents can work, go to school, or pursue other educational or training opportunities. The report (1) presents findings from interviews conducted by the Center for Law and Social Policy (CLASP) with representatives from national home visiting models, as well as stake holders and experts in the field at the state and local level; (2) explores considerations and opportunities for using home visiting to serve children in kinship care or with FFN caregivers; and (3) highlights promising models for serving these populations. The report also offers recommendations for state and federal policymakers.

Contact: Center for Law and Social Policy, 1200 18th Street, N.W., Suite 200, Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 906-8000 Fax: (202) 842-2885 E-mail: http://www.clasp.org/about/contact Web Site: http://www.clasp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child care, Children, Families, Family support Programs, Family support services, Grandparents, Home visiting, Model programs, Parents, Policy development, Research

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Johnson K. 2009. State-based home visiting: Strengthening programs through state leadership. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, 27 pp.

Annotation: This report examines whether states are investing in home visiting in ways that promote better outcomes for young children and whether they meet the needs of children facing the greatest social and developmental risks. The report describes the results of a National Center for Children in Poverty survey and a roundtable discussion, each designed to increase knowledge about state-based home visiting programs.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: At risk children, Child development, Child health, Home visiting, Low income groups, Poverty, State programs, Young children

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Knoke D. 2009. Early childhood home visiting programs. Toronto, ON, Canada: Centres of Excellence for Children's Well-Being, 5 pp. (CECW Information no. 73E)

Annotation: This information sheet describes the goals of early childhood home visiting programs and examines their effects on parents, parenting, child development and child maltreatment. It explains why healthy development is important, what services home visitors provide, who receives early childhood home visiting services, whether these services improve parental and child outcomes, and factors that influence the effectiveness of the programs.

Contact: Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare, c/o The Child Welfare League of Canada, 226 Argyle Ave., Ottowa, Ontario, Canada K2P 1B9, Telephone: (613) 235-4412 Web Site: http://www.cwlc.ca/en/projects/cecw .

Keywords: Child abuse, Community programs, Early childhood development, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Social services

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Koball H, Zaveri H, Boller K, Daro D, Knab J, Paulsell D, Hargreaves M, Strong DA, Malone L, Del Grosso P, Xue Y. 2009. Cross-site evaluation of the supporting evidence-based home visiting grantee cluster: Evaluation design-Volume 1. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, ca 160 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report describes the cross-site evaluation design to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. It focuses on domains central to the implementation and monitoring of home visiting programs: systems change, fidelity to the evidence-based model, costs of home visiting programs, and family and child outcomes. It analyzes the process that each grantee uses to implement the grant; uses data from local evaluations and crosssite research to assess participant, program, and systems outcomes; and describes the infrastructure supports for and the implementation fidelity of the home visiting programs as well as detailed information about data collection and analysis plans. The programs discussed were funded by the Children's Bureau, U.S. Administration for Children and Families.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early intervention, Home visiting, MCH research, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Research methodology

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Koball H, Zaveri H, Boller K, Daro D, Knab J, Paulsell D, Hargreaves M, Strong DA, Malone L, Del Grosso P, Xue Y. 2009. Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment: Overview of the cross-site evaluation. [Princeton, NJ]: Mathematica Policy Research, 14 pp. (Supporting evidence-based home visiting to prevent child maltreatment)

Annotation: This report summarizes a cross-site evaluation design of 17 evidence-based home visiting (EBHV) programs, funded by the Children's Bureau, U.S. Administration for Children and Families, in 13 states to identify successful strategies for adopting, implementing, and sustaining high-quality home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. It provides an overview of the EBHV grantees and their selected program models. Five domains are identified and studied including (1) systems change, (2) fidelity to the evidence-based model, (3) costs of home visiting programs, (4) family and child outcomes, and (5) process study. Additional contents include a description of the analytic approach, evaluation technical assistance, and utilization-focused reporting and dissemination.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child maltreatment, Early intervention, Home visiting, MCH research, Program descriptions, Program evaluation

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Regel CA. 2009. Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children Program: Follow the Child—Final report. Missoula, MO: Missoula City/County Health Department, 47 pp.

Annotation: This final report provides information about the Follow the Child project, which integrates foster children in Missoula County, Montana, into existing public health systems for preventive health care, including home visits, and and sets up consultations with foster parents and social workers. Contents include a description of the purpose of the project, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, publications and products, dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow-up. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org

Keywords: Child health, Final reports, Foster care, Foster children, Foster parents, Health care systems, Montana, Prevention, Service Integration

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Stavrakos JC, Summerville G, Johnson LE. 2009. Growing what works: Lessons learned from Pennsylvania's Nurse-Family Partnership Initiative. Philadelphia, PA: Public/Private Ventures, 42 pp.

Annotation: This report, which focuses on the Pennsylvania Nurse-Family Partnership Initiative, provides lessons for policymakers and funders interested in bringing proven models of home visiting to a statewide scale. The report emphasizes the importance of capitalizing on the unique advantage of geographic proximity to build a network of sites. Topic include (1) reasons to replicate the nurse family partnership, (2) bringing the nurse-family partnership to scale in Pennsylvania, and (3) lessons learned.

Contact: Public/Private Ventures, 2000 Market Street, Suite 600, Philadelphia, PA 19103, Telephone: (215) 557-4400 Secondary Telephone: (215) 557-4411 Fax: (215) 557-4469 E-mail: publications@ppv.org Web Site: http://www.ppv.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Families, Financing, Home visiting, Initiatives, Model programs, Nurses, Pennsylvania, Provider networks, Public policy, State programs

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Stoltzfus E, Lynch KE. 2009. Home visitation for families with young children. [Washington, DC]: Congressional Research Service, 55 pp. (CRS report for Congress)

Annotation: This report examines home visiting as a service strategy for families with young children or those who are expecting children. It provides an overview of current practices and initiatives in home visiting, including a review of selected home visiting models; a discussion of home visiting program implementation by states; and a summary of the current home visiting initiative of the Administration for Children and Families (ACF). The report also discusses existing federal, state, and local funding streams for home visiting; current methods used for evaluating program models; and research findings according to desired program outcomes. Administration and Congressional proposals to support home visiting are also provided. Tables include (1) an overview of six home visiting models; (2) the number of home visiting sites by selected program model and state; and (3) examples of how federal funding streams from different federal agencies might be used to support early childhood home visiting programs. The appendices include (1) selected federal programs that provide or support home visitation and (2) federal initiatives related to coordination of early childhood programs and services.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early intervention programs, Federal initiatives, Financing, High risk children, Home visiting, Model programs, Program descriptions, Program evaluation, Young children

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U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau. 2009. Promoting health literacy through case management. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau,

Annotation: This webinar, held on October 20, 2009, discusses ways to promote health literacy among parents of young children using case managers and other home visitors. The webinar presents a case study of the Enterprise Community Healthy Start program in rural Georgia. The site includes meeting materials, speaker presentations, and a video of the webinar. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 18-05, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (800) 311-BABY (311-2229) Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Case management, Case studies, Distance education, Georgia, Health literacy, Health promotion, Healthy Start, Home visiting

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Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and Brookings Institution. 2009. Preventing child maltreatment. Princeton, NJ: Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs; Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 210 pp. (The future of children; v. 19, no. 2, Fall 2009)

Annotation: This issue of The Future of Children explores policies and programs on how to prevent child abuse and neglect. Articles discuss the importance of an investment-driven prevention approach; characteristics of families associated with elevated risk for maltreatment; community-wide, parenting, and home-visiting prevention programs; preventing abuse and neglect by parents with drug or alcohol problems and preventing sexual abuse; and the present and future roles of the child protection system in preventing abuse.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-9814705-3-5.

Keywords: Child abuse, Child neglect, Child protective services, Child sexual abuse, Community programs, Drug abuse, Families, High risk children, High risk groups, Home visiting, Maltreated children, Parent education programs, Parenting skills, Prevention

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Cardone I, Gilkerson L, Wechsler N. 2008. Teenagers and their babies: A perinatal home visitor's guide. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 163 pp.

Annotation: This book provides home visitors with examples on how to help expectant and new adolescent parents build deep and enduring bonds of attachment with their baby. Methods and strategies based on Community-Based Family Administered Neonatal Activities are discussed in a step-by-step review of how to implement a research-validated, structured intervention plan. Examples from six prenatal and one postnatal home visits describe techniques and activities designed to help build the strong mother-child relationships that prevent child abuse and strengthen the self-confidence and competence of young families. The appendices include resources on pregnancy and newborn infants , as well as information on fetal movement and newborn behavior, hearing, behavioral states, touch, smell and taste, vision, and a postnatal home visiting guide.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org $29.95, plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-934019-16-0.

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Adolescent pregnancy, Early intervention services, Fetal development, Home visiting, Mother child relations, Newborn infants, Pregnancy, Pregnant adolescents, Training materials

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Connard C, Katzev AR. 2008. Quick start for Healthy Start staff. (Rev. ed.). Salem, OR: Oregon Commission on Children and Families, 159 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides basic program and training information to new Healthy Start staff members in Oregon on home visiting and family support for first-time parents to ensure healthy, thriving children and nurturing, caring families. Orientation topics include program goals, services, policies and operating procedures; an overview of home visiting and family support philosophy; child abuse and neglect indicators and reporting requirements; program relationship with other community resources; issues of confidentiality; and issues related to boundaries. Additional topics for home visitors include interviewing and communication skills, relationships, planning a home visit, case planning, record keeping, as well as information on promoting positive parenting.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Case management, Family support, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Manuals, Oregon, Parent education, Parent support services, Resources for professionals, State programs

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Elliston MS. 2008. Building a system of home visiting in New Mexico: The next three years 2009 - 2012. Santa Fe, NM: New Mexico Children, Youth and Families Department, 39 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the recommendations for the home visiting system recommended by a workgroup that met in 2007-2008 to conduct a systematic review of scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of early childhood home visitation, review the models present in New Mexico and in other states, establish standards and outcomes for effective home visitation in New Mexico, and develop the roadmap for a statewide system that offers easy access to comprehensive home visiting services to all families starting before birth and continuing up to age 3 based on families' preferences, strengths, needs, and risk factors. Recommendations cover expected outcomes, identification of families served, home visiting as part of the maternal and child health system, investment in and financing of programs, minimum standards, and evaluation.

Contact: New Mexico Early Childhood Action Network, NM E-mail: ecan.nm@gmail.com Web Site: http://www.earlychildhoodnm.com

Keywords: Child health, Early childhood development, Evaluation, Families, Financing, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, New Mexico, Risk factors, Service delivery systems, Young children

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Illback RJ, Sanders D, Pennington M, Sanders D, Kilmer A. 2008. Health Access Nurturing Development Services (HANDS): Kentucky's home visiting program for first time parents—Program evaluation findings. Louisville, KY: REACH of Louisville, 34 pp.

Annotation: This report is a compilation of the evaluation research conducted for The Healthy Access Nurturing Development Services program, Kentucky's home-visiting program for first-time parents. Findings from multiple studies, occurring since the program's inception in 1999, are summarized. The report includes a program description and discussions of recipient demographics and service delivery, program outcomes, and comparisons based on home visitor pre-service education.

Contact: Great Kids Inc., 100 North 72 Avenue, Suite 200 , Wausau, WI 54401 , Telephone: 800-906-5581 Secondary Telephone: 626-345-0684 E-mail: jeang@greatkidsinc.net Web Site: http://www.greatkidsinc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Families, High risk group, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Kentucky, Low income groups, Mental health, Parenting skills, Prevention, Program evaluation, Research, Substance abuse

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Isaacs J. 2008. Nurse home visiting. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families and First Focus, 6 pp. (Impacts of early childhod programs, research brief no. 5)

Annotation: This research brief, which is one in a series on early childhood programs, focuses on nurse home visiting to low-income, first-time mothers between pregnancy and the child's second birthday. The brief discusses what nurse home visiting is, what is its impact on children and mothers, how impacts vary, how strong is the evidence base for nurse home visiting, whether nurse home visiting is generally viewed as effective, and what federal legislative action lies ahead for nurse home visiting.

Contact: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6058 Fax: (202) 797-2968 E-mail: ccf@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu/ccf.aspx .

Keywords: Adolescent mothers, Child health, Early childhood development, Families, Home visiting, Infant development, Infant health, Low income groups, Mothers, Pregnant women, Single mothers, Young children

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Klass CS. 2008. The home visitor's guidebook: Promoting optimal parent and child development. (3rd ed.). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Company, 412 pp.

Annotation: This book provides techniques home visitors can use to improve their relationships with the parents and children with whom they work; it develops a multidisciplinary approach to the profession. The book first reviews the historical development of the profession and examines the home visitor's interpersonal skills and attitudes and their professional development. The book then covers topics regularly encountered during home visits: developing a sense of self; guidance and discipline; communications and language; play, learning, and development; everyday rituals and celebrations; children's illnesses; siblings; and the psychologically vulnerable family. The book concludes with a chapter examining issues related to personal history and professional competence; as well as resources, endnotes, references, and an index.

Contact: Brookes Publishing, P.O. Box 10624, Baltimore, MD 21285-0624, Telephone: (800) 638-3775 Secondary Telephone: (410) 337-9580 Fax: (410) 337-8539 E-mail: custserv@brookespublishing.com Web Site: http://www.brookespublishing.com $34.00; no shipping and handling charge if prepaid. Document Number: ISBN 978-1-55766-903-2.

Keywords: Child development, Family centered services, Home visiting, Interdisciplinary approach, Parent child relationships, Parenting

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Minnesota Department of Health. 2008. Family home visiting: Report to the Minnesota Legislature 2008. St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, 10 pp.

Annotation: This report describes the Family Home Visiting (FHV) program in Minnesota, including amendments made in 2007 by the Minnesota Legislature to the state's FHV statute and plans submitted by community health boards to keep the family home visiting programs in compliance with the new legislation. The report also provides a summary of nurse home visiting programs in the United States, including a brief history, cost benefits, and evidence of effectiveness.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Families, Home visiting, Minnesota, Reports, State legislation, State programs

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Minnesota Department of Health. 2008. Minnesota family home visiting 2008 Community Health Board plan report. [St. Paul, MN]: Minnesota Department of Health, 13 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes the family home visiting plans that were submitted to the Commissioner of Health in March, 2008 by Minnesota's 53 community health boards. The report describes: (a) the clients, programs, and staffing of Family Home Visiting programs; (b) how the programs address diversity issues; c) the identification and outreach strategies, the screening and assessment tools, and the curricula( used; (d) the documentation systems used and the evaluation outcomes measured; (e) the home visitor and supervisor training needs identified; (f) how the programs are funded; as well as (g) the types of relationships they have with their community partners.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, P.O. Box 64975, St. Paul, MN 55164-0975, Telephone: (651) 201-5000 Secondary Telephone: (888) 345-0823 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Minnesota, Program descriptions, State programs

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NPC Research. 2008. Healthy Start evaluation manual. Salem, OR: Oregon Commission on Children and Families, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: This manual serves as a tool for collecting data on the effectiveness of Oregon's Healthy Start program, a statewide home visiting program designed to prevent child maltreatment using the Healthy Families of America program model. The manual provides an overview of the program and describes the Healthy Start data collection and evaluation system required by the Oregon legislation. It includes an overview of data collection procedures and screening and assessment tools and provides directions on how to fill out and submit the necessary intake forms, surveys, and HOME (Home Observation for Measurement of the Environment) Inventory.

Contact: Oregon Commission on Children and Families, 530 Center Street, NE, Suite 405, Salem, OR 97301, Telephone: (503) 373-1283 Fax: (503) 378-8395 E-mail: OCCF.Mail@class.oregonvos.net Web Site: http://egov.oregon.gov/OCCF/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Evaluation methods, Healthy Start, Home visiting, Injury prevention, Maltreated children, Manuals, Oregon, Outcome evaluation, Program evaluation, Public health services, State programs

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Smart Start Oklahoma. 2008. Home visitation issue brief. Oklahoma, City, OK: Smart Start Oklahoma, 12 pp.

Annotation: This brochure reviews the quality of life and financial impact that five Oklahoma based home visitation programs have on school readiness health for children. Listed for each program is its name, area of oversight, state funding for fiscal year 2008, geographic area served, enrollment criteria, number served, services provided, and outcomes. The brochure also reviews the strengths and challenges of the system and describes opportunities to further strengthen the system.

Contact: Smart Start Oklahoma, 421 N.W. 13th Street, Suite 270, Oklahoma City, OK 73103, Telephone: (405) 278-6978 Secondary Telephone: (866) 283-0987 E-mail: http://www.smartstartok.org/about_us/contact_us Web Site: http://www.smartstartok.org .

Keywords: Children, Home visiting, Oklahoma, School readiness, State programs, Young children

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U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Training Branch. 2008. MCH Training Program All Grantee Meeting: 65 years and counting—The legacy and future of MCH leadership. [Rockville, MD: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Training Branch, 1 v.

Annotation: This binder includes materials from the MCH Training Program All Grantee Meeting held on April 22-23, 2008, in Washington, DC. Binder sections include (1) agenda, (2) presentations, (3) workgroup products, (4) biographical summaries, (5) participant lists, (6) grantee successes, (7) DC area information, and (8) evaluations. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Division of Maternal and Child Health Workforce Development, Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 18-05, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2340 E-mail: lkavanagh@hrsa.gov Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov/training Available from the website.

Keywords: Conference materials, Federal grants, Federal programs, MCH programs, MCH training

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Allegheny County Health Department, Perinatal Periods of Risk (PPOR) Team, and American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter. [2007]. Educating parents and caregivers about infant safe sleep: A guide for home visitors. Pittsburgh, PA: Allegheny County Health Department, 57 pp.

Annotation: This toolkit provides home visitors with guidance on how to provide parents and caregivers with information about infant safe sleep in a sensitive and culturally appropriate way. The toolkit includes questions to use in beginning a conversation about safe sleep. The toolkit also presents some of the most common reasons stated for not following infant safe sleep practices and suggestions for how to respond the these reasons. Illustrations are included.

Contact: Allegheny County Health Department, 3333 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, Telephone: (412) 687-ACHD Fax: (412) 578-8325 E-mail: http://www.achd.net/contact.php Web Site: http://www.achd.net/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Communication, Cultural sensitivity, Home visiting, Infant health, Parents, Prevention, SIDS, Safety, Sleep position, Training materials

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Carrilio TE. 2007. Home-visiting strategies: A case-management guide for caregivers. Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 153 pp. (Social problems and social issues)

Annotation: This book offers information on the development, operation, and evaluation of family support programs and discusses the steps of the case-management process carried out by the home visitor. Chapters one and two address issues of theory, research, and organizational context. Chapters three through nine provide a hands-on guide for home visitors in case management involving home-visiting services and issues surrounding work in teams. Chapter ten introduces ways in which home-visiting and office-based activities can be integrated and setting up documentation systems and managing quality and data collection. References and an index are provided.

Contact: University of South Carolina Press, 718 Devine Street, Columbia, SC Telephone: (800) 768-2500 Fax: (800) 868-0740 Web Site: http://www.sc.edu/uscpress $21.95, plus shipping and handling.

Keywords: Case assessment, Case management, Family support services, Home care services, Home visiting, Postnatal care, Prenatal care

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District of Columbia Department of Health. 2007. Addressing infant mortality in DC: Citywide action plan. Washington, DC: District of Columbia Department of Health, 4 pp.

Annotation: This action plan describes steps by the District of Columbia to address maternal and child health needs and to reduce infant mortality in 2008. Topics include increasing capacity and impact of the home visitation program for pregnancy women, enhancing collaboration between the District of Columbia's health administration initiatives and other sectors of government serving at-risk women and families, and increasing coordination between government and the community to ensure a comprehensive city-wide approach to reducing infant mortality. Charts outline service of initiative strategies, participating agencies, and timeline goals.

Contact: District of Columbia Department of Health, 899 North Capitol Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002, Telephone: (202) 442-5955 Fax: (202) 442-4795 E-mail: doh@dc.gov Web Site: http://doh.dc.gov/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, District of Columbia, Health services, Home visiting, Infant health, Infant mortality, Local initiatives, Maternal health, Pregnant women, Prevention services, Strategic plans

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Isaacs JB. 2007. Cost-effective investments in children. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, 40 pp. (Budgeting for national priorities paper)

Annotation: This paper reviews cost-benefit evidence to identify four areas of investment that merit expanded federal funding. The four areas are (1) high-quality early childhood education programs for 3- and 4-year-olds, (2) nurse home-visiting programs to promote prenatal care and infant and early childhood development, (3) school reform with an emphasis on programs in high-poverty elementary schools that improve the acquisition of basic skills for all students, and (4) programs that reduce the incidence of adolescent pregnancy. The paper includes a summary as well as a detailed discussion of each of these areas. Endnotes are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the paper. The paper includes one appendix: a detailed descripiton of reforms to improve teacher quality.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent pregnancy, Costs, Early childhood development, Early childhood education, Elementary schools, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, Poverty, Prenatal care, Prevention, Young children

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Isaacs JB. 2007. Impacts of early childhood programs. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution, Center on Children and Families and First Focus, 29 pp.

Annotation: This set of research briefs provides policymakers with a summary of evidence on several early childhood interventions and their impact on children and families. The briefs discuss (1) state pre-kindergarten programs, (2) Head Start, (3) Early Head Start, (4) model early childhood programs (Abecedarian project, High Scope/Perry Preschool, and Chicago Child-Parent Centers), and (5) nurse home visiting. For each, the brief explains what the intervention is, what is its impact, and how impacts vary.

Contact: Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20036, Telephone: (202) 797-6000 Fax: (202) 797-6004 E-mail: communications@brookings.edu Web Site: http://www.brookings.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Early Head Start, Early intervention programs, Head Start, Home visiting, Model programs, Oral health, Public policy, State programs, Young children

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National Human Services Assembly, Family Strengthening Policy Center. 2007. Home visiting: Strengthening families by promoting parenting success. Washington, DC: National Human Services Assembly, Family Strengthening Policy Center, 18 pp. (Policy brief no. 23)

Annotation: This policy brief focuses on early childhood home visiting as a place-based family-strengthening strategy that supports parents and caregivers as a key influence on the lives of young children. (In this context, place-based family strenghthening means that children do better when their families are strong, and families do better when they live in communities that help them succeed.) The brief provides an overview of the purpose of home visiting programs, a cost analysis of such programs, information on improving home visiting services, and recommendations. A conclusion, a list of resources, and endnotes are included.

Contact: National Human Services Assembly, Family Strengthening Policy Center, 1319 F Street, N.W., Suite 402, Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 347-2080 Fax: (202) 393-4517 E-mail: fspc@nassembly.org Web Site: http://www.nydic.org/fspc/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Communities, Early childhood development, Family support programs, Family support services, High risk children, Home visiting, Parents, Young children

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Zero to Three Policy Center. 2007. Home visiting: Supporting babies and families where they live. Washington, DC: Zero to Three, 3 pp. (Fact sheet)

Annotation: This fact sheet provides policy recommendations and research into the effectiveness of home visiting for delivering services to families in their home including health care, parenting education, child abuse prevention, and early intervention for young children with disabilities. Three home visit programs are discussed: the Nurse-Family Partnership, the Parents as Teachers Program, and Healthy Families Arizona.

Contact: Zero To Three, 1255 23rd Street, N.W., Suite 350, Washington, DC 20037, Telephone: (202) 638-1144 Fax: (202) 638-0851 Web Site: http://www.zerotothree.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Community programs, Family support services, Health services delivery, Home care services, Home visiting, MCH services, Program descriptions

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Association of State and Territorial Health Officials. 2006. Bringing home better birth outcomes. Washington, DC: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 6 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief examines home visiting as a strategy employed by state health agencies to deliver public health interventions aimed at improving birth outcomes. It provides an overview of home visiting programs; a discussion of goals, target populations, common service components, outcomes, and financing of state level programs; and examples of programs from four states and one territory. Additional topics include benefits and costs and program challenges. Resources and references conclude the brief. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Association of State and Territorial Health Officials, 2231 Crystal Drive, Suite 450, Arlington, VA 22202, Telephone: (202) 371-9090 Fax: (571) 527-3189 Web Site: http://www.astho.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Case studies, Early intervention, Georgia, Home care services, Home visiting, MCH research, Maine, Montana, Oklahoma, Postpartum care, Pregnancy counseling, Pregnancy outcomes, Prenatal care, Public health services, Puerto Rico, State MCH programs

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Daro D. 2006. Home visitation: Assessing progress, managing expectations. Chicago, IL: Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chapin Hall Center for Children, 17 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this paper is to promote analytical thinking and the use of evaluative research as they relate to assessing home visiting programs. The paper reviews the evolution of such programs and the research that has evaluated them, discusses improvements to the programs, and outlines reasonable expectations for the programs in the future.

Contact: Ounce of Prevention Fund, 33 West Monroe Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, IL 60603-6198, Telephone: (312) 922-3863 Fax: (312) 922-3337 E-mail: info@ounceofprevention.org Web Site: http://www.ounceofprevention.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Home visiting, Program evaluation, Programs, Quality assurance, Research

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Daro D. 2006. Home visitation: Assessing progress, managing expections. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall Center for Children, 17 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about assessing the effectiveness of home visiting programs and managing expectation for what such programs can accomplish. The report provides background information about home visiting programs that are designed for new parents, and it discussees evaluating research and program outcomes, ensuring improved outcomes, and moving forward to increase the effectiveness of home visiting programs and also to promote realistic expectations of what such programs can do. References are included.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Early childhood development, Early intervention, Families, Home visiting, Infant health, Parenting skills, Parents, Prevention, Program evaluation

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2006. Family, friend and neighbor care in Early Head Start: Strengthening relationships and enhancing quality. Washington, DC: Early Head Start National Resource Center, 16 pp. (Technical assistance paper no. 11)

Annotation: This paper discusses ways in which Early Head Start (EHS) has become more involved in working with family, friend, and neighbor caregivers of infants and young children through the Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project launched in 2003. Topics include the importance of family, friend, and neighbor caregiving; the unique issues of family, friend, and neighbor care for EHS; and enhanced home visiting as an EHS response.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available from the website.

Keywords: Caregivers, Child care, Early Head Start, Early childhood development, Families, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Young children

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Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy. 2006. Home visiting as an intervention in infant mental health. Tallahassee, FL: Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, 2 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet provides information on home visiting and how effective it is at improving infant mental health. The fact sheet provides background about home visiting and discusses research on the effects of home visiting on parenting behavior and attitudes, maternal education, child abuse, child cognitive outcomes.

Contact: Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, 1339 East Lafayette Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, Telephone: (850) 922-1300 Fax: (850) 922-1352 E-mail: cpeip@fsu.edu Web Site: http://www.cpeip.fsu.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: , Child abuse, Child health, Cognitive development, Educational attainment, High risk groups, Infant health, Mental health, Parent attitudes, Parenting skills

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Goodman A. 2006. The story of David Olds and the Nurse Home Visiting Program. Princeton, NJ: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 20 pp.

Annotation: This report focuses on David Olds, who began developing a nurse home-visitation model in 1977 designed to help low-income, first-time mothers take better care of themselves and their infants. His model eventually grew into the Nurse-Family Partnership, a nonprofit organization serving more than 20,000 mothers in 20 states.The report provides background about Olds and how his model originated and discusses putting the model to the test, rolling out the program, and growing the program.

Contact: Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Route One and College Road, East, P.O. Box 2316, Princeton, NJ 08543, Telephone: (877) 843-7953 Fax: Web Site: http://www.rwjf.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Family support programs, Home visiting, Infants, Low income groups, Mothers, National programs, Visiting nurses

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Pacey PL, St. Jean L, Lehan AV. 2006. Nurse home visitor program: Performance audit. Boulder, CO: Pacey Economics Group, 40 pp.

Annotation: This report contains the results of a performance audit of the Nurse Home Visitor Program within the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment. The program offers home visits by specially trained nurses to first-time, low-income mothers during pregnancy and through the child's second birthday. The report focuses on program costs and eligibility, including the following specific areas: service costs, caseload, client attribution, administrative costs, cost information, Medicaid reimbursement, reimbursement rates, oversight of Medicaid billing process, eligibility determination/income verification, and local site monitoring.

Contact: Colorado Office of the State Auditor, 200 East 14th Avenue, Denver, CO 80203, Telephone: (303) 869-2800 Fax: (303) 869-3060 Web Site: http://www.leg.state.co.us/OSA/coauditor1.nsf/Home Available from the website. Document Number: Report control number 1744.

Keywords: Child health, Colorado, Costs, Eligibility, Evaluation, Family support programs, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Mothers, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Pregnancy, Reimbursement, State programs, Young children

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Paulsell D, Mekos D, Del Grosso P, Banghart P, Nogales R. 2006. Reaching out to kith and kin caregivers in Early Head Start. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 4 pp. (Trends in family programs and policy; Issue brief; no. 2)

Annotation: This issue brief describes the early implementation experience of Early Head Start pilot projects that arrange home visits to caregivers, organize support and training events, and give or lend materials such as age-appropriate books and toys and home safety items. The brief is based on visits to sites after one year of operation, as well as on information on the characteristics of enrolled children, families, and caregivers. The brief discusses use of kith and kin (families, friends, and neighbors) care; looks at pilot sites, families, and caregivers; discusses service delivery, and talks about next steps. General information about home visitation in the United States and about Early Head Start home visits is also included.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Early Head Start, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Pilot projects, Service delivery, Training, Young children

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Paulsell D, Mekos D, Del Grosso P, Banghart P, Nogales R. 2006. The Enhanced Home Visiting pilot project: How Early Head Start programs are reaching out to kith and kin caregivers—Final interim report. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 82 pp.

Annotation: This interim report descibes the early implementation experiences of Early Head Start Enhanced Home Visiting pilot projects. The report is based on site visits to participating programs after approximately 1 year of pilot operation, as well as on information collected by programs on the characteristics of children, families, and caregivers enrolled in the pilot. The report, which includes an executive summary, also discusses pilot program design; characteristics of children, families, and caregivers; delivery of services during the first year of implementation; and early implementation lessons. References are included. Statistical information is presented in tables throughout the report.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Community programs, Early Head Start, Families, Home visiting, Infants, Pilot projects, Service delivery, Young children

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Paulsell D, Mekos D, Del Grosso P, Rowand C, Banghart P. 2006. Strategies for supporting quality in kith and kin child care: Findings from the Early Head Start Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot evaluation. Princeton, NJ: Mathematica Policy Research, 119 pp.

Annotation: This final report describes the experiences of the Early Head Start Enhanced Home Visiting Pilot Project, an initiative designed to support the quality of care that kith and kin caregivers provide to infants and young children enrolled in Early Head Start. The report focuses on the project's first 2 years of implementation. Topics include pilot overview (design, staffing, and target population); delivery of services to caregivers; Characteristics of caregiving arrangements; sustainability and potential replication of pilot models; and implementation progress, challenges, and lessons for replication.

Contact: Mathematica Policy Research, P.O. Box 2393, Princeton, NJ 08543-2393, Telephone: (609) 799-3535 Fax: (609) 799-0005 E-mail: info@mathematica-mpr.com Web Site: http://www.mathematica-mpr.com Available from the website.

Keywords: Child care, Community programs, Early Head Start, Families, Home visiting

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Wasserman M. 2006. Implementation of home visitation programs: Stories from the states. Chicago, IL: Chapin Hall, 10 pp. (Issue brief)

Annotation: This brief provides an overview of selected state home visitation programs supporting healthy infant and child development. Topics include development of the programs, sustaining adequate sources of funding, demonstrating program efficacy, ensuring quality in replicated programs, and future growth and development.

Contact: Chapin Hall at the University of Chicago, 1313 East 60th Street, Chicago, IL 60637, Telephone: (773) 753-5900 Fax: (773) 753-5940 Web Site: http://www.chapinhall.org Available from the website after free registration.

Keywords: Case studies, Community programs, Financing, Home visiting, MCH programs, Program descriptions, State programs

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Hegland S, Hughes K. [2005]. Ten evidence-based practices for home visiting programs. [Ames, IA]: Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Iowa State University, 4 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet lists ten strategies: program match, home visitor qualifications, preservice and inservice training, supervision, home visitor retention, family recruitment, cultural sensitivity, family engagement, parenting focus, and program intensity and duration, and specific recommendations that follow these strategies along with research that supports each strategy.

Contact: Early Childhood Iowa, IA Telephone: (515) 281-4321 Secondary Telephone: (515) 281-4537 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.state.ia.us/earlychildhood/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Guidelines, Home visiting

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Anderson C. 2005. Add Healthy Beginnings Nurse Home Visits to Early Head Start Program: [Final report]. Hastings, NE: Healthy Beginnings Parenting Program, Mary Lanning Memorial Hospital, 17 pp., plus appendices.

Annotation: This final report focuses on the Add Healthy Beginnings Nurse Home Visits to Early Head Start Program, located in south central Nebraska during the period March 3, 2000, to February 28, 2005. The purpose of the project was to provide nurse home visits to the Early Head Start Program to serve poor and at-risk families in three south central Nebraska counties. Report sections include (1) purpose of project and relationship to Socal Security Act (SSA) Title V maternal and child health programs, (2) goals and objectives, (3) methodology, (4) evaluation, (5) results and outcomes, (6) publications and products, (7) dissemination and utilization of results, (8) future plans and follow-up, and (9) type and amount of resources needed to replicate. The report includes an appendix that contains several forms for record keeping. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Families, Final reports, Head Start, High risk groups, High risk infants, Home visiting, Infant health, Nebraska, Poverty, Visiting nurses

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Gomby D. 2005. Home visitation in 2005: Outcomes for children and parents. Washington, DC: Invest in Kids Working Group, Committee for Economic Development, 88 pp. (Invest in kids working paper no. 7)

Annotation: This paper explores the extent to which research indicates that home visitation produces benefits for parents and children. The paper focuses on primary prevention programs that send individuals into the home of families with pregnant women, newborns, or children under age 5 on an ongoing basis and that seek to improve the lives of children by encouraging changes in the attitudes, knowledge, and/or behaviors of the parents. Topics include commonalities and differences across programs, benefits by outcome, long-term outcomes, delivering home visiting in combination with other services, costs and cost-benefit analyses, and the importance of quality services.

Contact: Partnership for America's Economic Success, 1025 F Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20004, Telephone: (202) 552-2000 E-mail: info@partnershipforsuccess.org Web Site: http://www.PartnershipforSuccess.org

Keywords: Attitudes, Behavior, Child health, Costs, Health services, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Maternal behavior, Parenting attitudes, Parents, Paternal behavior, Pregnant women, Programs, Young children

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Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section. 2005. Family home visiting guidelines. (Rev. ed.). St. Paul, MN: Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section, 20 pp.

Annotation: These guidelines, which update an earlier version, are designed to help community health boards and tribal governments in Minnesota in the provision of family home visiting (FHV) services funded with Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) dollars and to provide guidance on the use of three Local Public Health Act funding sources for FHV services: State General Fund dollars, MCH Block Grant dollars, and TANF dollars. The guidelines discuss participant eligibility, public health nurse waivers, and out-of-state travel reimbursement policies. A list of definitions and terms is provided, as are federal poverty guidelines, and a checklist to determine whether participants are U.S. citizens. Interventions to prevent adolescent pregnancy are also discussed.

Contact: Minnesota Department of Health, Maternal and Child Health Section, P.O. Box 64882, 85 East Seventh Place, Suite 400, St. Paul, MN 55164-0882, Telephone: (651) 201-3760 Web Site: http://www.health.state.mn.us/divs/fh/mch .

Keywords: Adolescent pregnancy, American Indians, Block grants, Eligibility, Financing, Guidelines, Home visiting, Intervention, Minnesota, Minnesota, Poverty, Prevention, Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Waivers

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Nurse-Family Partnership. 2005. Nurse-Family Partnership: Helping first-time parents succeed. Denver, CO: Nurse-Family Partnership, 2 items.

Annotation: This brochure and fact sheet describes an evidence-based program of home visitation where nurses work with low-income, first-time mothers during pregnancy and the first two years of the child's life. Three goals are outlined: (1) improve pregnancy outcomes, (2) improve child health and development, and (3) improve families' economic self-sufficiency. The fact sheet provides additional topics on the evidence of program effects; growing national and international attention; key program elements and rationale; planning, consultation, and professional development and costs for program implementation, and contact information for additional program information. The brochure discusses program successes, experiences, and strengths; eligibility and enrollment, and other program information.

Contact: Nurse-Family Partnership, 1900 Grant Street, Suite 400, Denver, CO 80203, Telephone: (303) 327-4240 Secondary Telephone: (866) 864-5226 Fax: (303) 327-4260 E-mail: info@nursefamilypartnership.org Web Site: http://www.nursefamilypartnership.org/ Available at no charge.

Keywords: Child health, Family economics, Home visiting, Infant health, Low income groups, Newborn infants, Nursing services, Parent support programs, Postnatal care, Pregnant women, Prenatal care, Program descriptions

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Home Visiting Forum. [2004] (ca.). What makes supervision work: Recommendations from the home visiting field. [St. Louis, MO]: Parents as Teachers National Center, 22 pp.

Annotation: This report summarizes information from focus groups conducted by the Home Visiting Forum training group. Participants of the focus groups were supervisors in national home visiting programs. The report discusses supervisor needs and home visitor needs in the areas of supportive management, training and professional development, coherent program design, supervisor experience, community linkages, structure and communication, salary and compensation, facilities and support, evaluation, and access to mental health services for clients in the programs.

Contact: Parents as Teachers, 2228 Ball Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146, Telephone: (314) 432-4330 Secondary Telephone: (866) 728-4968 Fax: (314) 432-8963 Web Site: http://www.parentsasteachers.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Collaboration, Home visiting, Personnel management, Research, Supervision

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Des Moines Healthy Start Project. [2004]. Best practice manual. Des Moines, ID: Des Moines Healthy Start Project, 116 pp.

Annotation: This manual contains policies and procedures important to Healthy Start and Empowerment programs case managers in providing visiting nurse services to pregnant women and families with children to age five. The manual was developed for use in the Des Moines Healthy Start visiting nurse services program. The first section of the manual includes statements on participant rights, resources for case management agencies and a task force directory, program descriptions, a key to terms used, and qualifications and expectations for case managers. Part two details the case management model including key program features, guidelines, components, home visiting, facilitating services, and risk assessment criteria. The third part of the manual provides resource sheets for case managers to refer to when dealing with a variety of situations. Some of these topics include child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, emergency and basic needs, family planning, immunizations, infant home safety, lead poisoning, perinatal depression, preterm labor, subsequent pregnancies, sudden infant death syndrome, and others. The resource sheets provide information and additional print and organizational resources on each topic. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available for loan.

Keywords: Case management, Child care, Child health, Child safety, Family life education, Family support services, Health promotion, Healthy Start, Home care services, Home visiting, Infant care, Iowa, Manuals

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. A parent's guide to the Head Start home-based program option. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 24 pp.

Annotation: This guide introduces parents to Head Start's home-based program. The guide is divided into three parts. Part 1 describes what a home-based program is and what to expect. Part 2 explores how parents and Head Start home visitors can work together to best support a child's development. Part 3 offers ideas for how parents can help their child learn day by day, using objects and materials available at home.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Families, Family support, Head Start, Home visiting, Low income groups, Parents

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. Home visitor's handbook for the Head Start home-based program option. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 55 pp.

Annotation: This handbook provides tools to help Head Start home visitors perform their jobs effectively. It (1) provides the context for home visiting to help home visitors understand why home visiting is a successful strategy for delivering services and how to determine whether home visiting is the right option for families, (2) answers frequently asked questions, (3) discusses the relationship-building process with families as well as what is actually done during home visits, and (4) addresses how home visitors can get the support needed to perform their jobs well.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Children, Families, Family support, Head Start, Home visiting, Low income groups, Manuals

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. Program administrator's checklist for the Head Start home-based program option. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 6 pp.

Annotation: This tool was developed to help program administrators evaluate whether the Head Start home-based program option is right for their community. It described the community assessment and how it provides information to help administrators determine the best program option, explains what the home-based program entails, provides some questions to answer for administrators considering implementing a home-based program, and describes what makes a home-based program effective.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Administrative personnel, Children, Communities, Community based services, Head Start, Low income groups

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Early Head Start National Resource Center. 2004. Supervisor's manual for the Head Start home-based program option. Washington, DC: U.S. Head Start Bureau, 58 pp.

Annotation: This manual provides information, materials, and strategies to support supervisors of Head Start home-based programs in their work with home visitors. It includes an overview of the program, information on supervising home visitors, a discussion of supporting child and family development services, and a discussion of program management and continuous improvement. Eight appendices include a home-based supervisor self-assessment, a sample home visitor job description, a sample home visitor applicant interview, and more.

Contact: Early Childhood Learning and Knowledge Center, U.S. Office of Head Start, Telephone: (866) 763-6481 Web Site: http://eclkc.ohs.acf.hhs.gov/hslc Available at no charge; also available from the website.

Keywords: Child development, Children, Families, Family support, Head Start, Home visiting, Low income groups, Manuals, Program management

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Young T, Noel S. [2003] (ca.). Family care center home network [Final report]. Lexington, KY: Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, 24 pp.

Annotation: This final report, from the Healthy Tomorrows program, describes a home-based program providing early intervention designed to promote health child development, prenatal health, and enhance family functioning in overburdened families, including promoting parent-child bonding and attachment and decreasing maternal depression and child abuse. Contents include a project summary; a narrative including the project purpose, goals and objectives, methodology, evaluation, results and outcomes, a list of publications and products, summaries of dissemination and utilization of results, future plans and follow up, and support and resources needed to replicate. Also provided are lists of Home Network Advisory Board consumer and community, and family care center representatives. A copy of the 2002 Home Network participant satisfaction survey and newsletter are attached. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Lexington-Fayette County Health Department, 650 Newton Pike, Lexington, KY 40508, Telephone: (859) 252-2371 Contact Phone: (859) 258-3070 Fax: (859) 288-2359 Contact E-mail: ireneg@lfucg.com Web Site: http://www.lexingtonhealthdepartment.org

Keywords: Attachment behavior, Child development services, Early intervention programs, Family centered services, Family support programs, Final reports, Healthy Tomorrows Partnership for Children, Home visiting, MCH research, Parent child relations, Parent education, Prenatal care

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Galbraith L. [2003]. Proactive funding strategies for home visitation: A resource for counties. Washington, DC: National Association of Counties, 19 pp.

Annotation: This primer aims to provide home visitation advocates with strategies to attain long-term funding for programs. The primer addresses the following issues: (1) How do I make a financial argument for home visitation? (2) What else should I know about making an investment in home visitation? (3) What are my home visit options? (4) What are the costs associated with home visitation? (5) What are the sources of funding utilized by home visitation programs? (6) state funding, and (7) county funding. Three appendices include information on how to contact home visitation programs, resources for locating federal funding, and funding sources. The report concludes with a list of endnotes.

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Single copies available at no charge.

Keywords: Costs, County programs, Federal programs, Financing, Home visiting, State programs

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Gomby DS. 2003. Building school readiness through home visitation. Sacramento, CA: California Children and Families Commission, First 5 California, ca. 200 pp.

Annotation: This report explores the extent to which research indicates that home visitation can be used as a school readiness strategy. The paper describes the relationship between home visiting and the school readiness goals of the First 5 California Children and Families Commission and includes suggestions for program planners. The report includes the following sections: (1) executive summary, (2) introduction and main points, (3) background, (4) do home visitation programs build school readiness? (5) delivering home visits in combination with other services, (6) the drive for quality, (7) suggestions for program planners, and (8) conclusions. Some information is presented in tables and boxes. The report includes endnotes.

Contact: California Children and Families Commission, 2389 Gateway Oaks Drive, Suite 260, Sacramento, CA 95833, Telephone: (916) 263-1050 Secondary Telephone: (800) KIDS-025 Fax: (916) 263-1360 E-mail: info@ccfc.ca.gov Web Site: http://www.ccfc.ca.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: California, Home visiting, Program planning, School readiness

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Graham M, Powell A, Stabile I, Chiricos C. 2003. Partners for a healthy baby: A home visiting curriculum for new families—Baby's first six months. Tallahassee, FL: Florida State University Center for Prevention and Early Intervention Policy, 89 pp.

Annotation: This comprehensive curriculum guide is for home visitors to parents of infants newborn to six months of age. The first part of the guide gives an overview of the curriculum and basic information about the role of the home visitor. The second part contains weekly and monthly plans providing detailed purposes for each visit, discussion and prompts to use for introducing topics, instructions regarding what to observe, actions to take, and additional resources. The third part of the guide is a set of about 100 handouts for the family. Also in the binder is a home visit record, a list of resources, and an index to access information as needed. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Keywords: Curricula, Health supervision, Home visiting, Infant development, Infants, Parent support services, Parenting skills, Preservice training, Spanish language materials

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McConnochie KM. 2003. The in-home hospital-level care experiment: In Rochester, New York. Rochester, NY: Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester Medical Center, 6 pp.

Annotation: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the home nursing program in Monroe County, New York. The issues addressed are as follows: (1) the potential for implementing home nurse enhancement of primary care (HNEPC) on a community-wide basis, (2) the acceptance of HNEPC by families and providers, (3) the net impact of HNEPC on both hospitalization of episodes eligible for randomization and on overall community hospitalization rates, (4) the cost of care for episodes randomized to different groups, and (5) comparison of quality of care for illness episodes in the treatment group and in the control group. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Community Based Health Services, Cost Effectiveness, County Health Agencies, Health Care Utilization, Home Visiting Programs, Home Visiting Services, Home Visiting Services, Infants, MCH Research, Preschool Children, Primary Care, Quality Assurance, Research, School Age Children, Toddlers

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Parents as Teachers National Center. 2003. Parents as teachers: Good beginnings for all children. St. Louis, MI: Parents as Teachers National Center, 14 items.

Annotation: This information package is about the Parents as Teachers program which promotes teaching adolescent parents how to be effective as parents. Contents include several brochures about program services and membership (one in Spanish), a magnetic card and a brochure of tips for parents in times of trauma, a 44-page booklet on how to implement a Parent as Teachers program, an organizational summary report, and a catalog of training materials which can be ordered from the organization.

Contact: Parents as Teachers, 2228 Ball Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146, Telephone: (314) 432-4330 Secondary Telephone: (866) 728-4968 Fax: (314) 432-8963 Web Site: http://www.parentsasteachers.org Available at no charge.

Keywords: Adolescent fathers, Adolescent mothers, Adolescent parents, Early intervention programs, Home visiting, Parent education, Parenting skills, Trauma

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FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention. Supporting evidence based home visiting. Chapel Hill, NC: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources on adopting, implementing, and sustaining home visiting programs to prevent child maltreatment. Contents include briefs, reports, and presentations from a cross-site evaluation of federal grantee programs; home visiting models; technical assistance contacts; resources for researching home visiting programs; and a newsletter.

Contact: FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, Chapel Hill Training Outreach Project, 800 Eastowne Drive, Suite 105, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, Web Site: http://www.friendsnrc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal grants, Home visiting, Model programs, Program evaluation, Technical assistance

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U.S. Administration for Children and Families. Home visiting evidence of effectiveness [HomVEE]. Washington, DC: U.S. Administration for Children and Families,

Annotation: This website provides information and resources from a review of the home visiting research literature and assessment of the evidence of effectiveness for home visiting program models that target families with pregnant women and children from birth to age 5. Contents include the project description, program model reports, outcome domain reports, implementation profiles, information about the review process, and a study search tool.

Contact: U.S. Administration for Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, S.W., Washington, DC 20447, Telephone: (202) 401-9215 Secondary Telephone: (800) 422-4453 Web Site: http://www.acf.hhs.gov Available from the website.

Keywords: Federal initiatives, Home visiting, Model programs, Outcome and process assessment, Research reviews

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