[Skip to Content]
Georgetown University NCEMCH | MCH Navigator
Search the Databases

Search
Advanced Search

Site Tools

Partner Projects

MCH Social Media

Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Library.

Search For: Keyword: Ethnic factors

   |   Expand All Items Collapse All Items

   |   

Displaying records 1 through 10 of 362 found.
Toggle Details

University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health. n.d.. Ethnicity and maternal and child health care. Baltimore, MD: University of Maryland-Baltimore, Center for Social Work Education in Maternal and Child Health, ca. 75 pp.

Annotation: This unpublished document contains a set of 4 teaching modules: (1) Ethnicity and Healthy Birth Outcomes; (2) Ethnicity and Genetic Disease; (3) Culture and AIDS Prevention in Adolescents; and (4) Using the Internet in Maternal and Child Health. Each of the modules contains lesson objectives; a suggested reading list followed by a section of summaries; and suggested assignments and class presentations geared towards the objectives discussed at the beginning of each module. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: University of Maryland School of Social Work, Center for Maternal and Child Health Social Work Education, 525 West Redwood Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, Telephone: (410) 706-7533 Fax: (410) 706-6046 Web Site: http://cmchswe.umaryland.edu Contact for cost information.

Keywords: Adolescent health, Child health, Disease prevention, Educational materials, Ethnic factors, Internet, MCH training, Maternal health

Toggle Details

Damiano PC, Park KH, Robinson EL. 2014. Health disparities among children in Iowa: Results from the 2010 Iowa Child and Family Household Health Survey. Iowa City, IA: University of Iowa Public Policy Center, 30 pp., plus tables

Annotation: This report presents findings from the 2010 Iowa Child and Family Household Health survey completed by parents of infants, children, and adolescents from birth through age 17. The report analyzes racial and ethnic health disparities and reports significant differences in the health status of Iowa's parents and children based on race and ethnicity. The report examines overall health status, oral health, and children with special health care needs (CSHCN). It also compares health insurance coverage; participation in a medical home; parental health and neighborhood characteristics; lifestyle and behavior (including screen time, nutrition, and physical activity); and issues such as access to care, preventive care, and behavioral and emotional health. Graphs provided throughout the report reflect disparities between Hispanic, White, African-American, and Asian and Pacific Island populations.

Contact: University of Iowa, Health Policy Research Program, Public Policy Center, 227 South Quadrangle, Iowa City, IA 52242, Telephone: (319) 335-6800 Fax: 319/335-6801 E-mail: peter-damiano@uiowa.edu Web Site: http://ppc.uiowa.edu/ Available from the website.

Keywords: Child health, Data, Ethnic factors, Families, Health status disparities, Iowa, Racial factors, Reports, State initiatives, State surveys

Toggle Details

Addy S, Engelhardt W, Skinner C. 2013. Basic facts about low-income children. New York, NY: National Center for Children in Poverty, various. (Fact sheets)

Annotation: This web site provides access to fact sheets with 2011 statistical data about children and adolescents who live in families with low incomes in the United States. Topics include parental employment, parental education, family structure and other variables that play an important role in predicting the likelihood that a child will endure economic hardship. The facts sheets are divided into five age groups of children: Under Age 3, Under Age 6, Ages 6 to 11, Ages 12 to 17, and Children Under 18. Additional information for previous years is provide on the web site along with additional information on parental nativity, food insecurity, English language proficiency, intergenerational mobility, and other topics.

Contact: National Center for Children in Poverty, 215 West 125th Street, Third Floor, New York, NY 10027, Telephone: (646) 284-9600 Fax: (646) 284-9623 E-mail: info@nccp.org Web Site: http://www.nccp.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescents, Children, Economic factors, Ethnic factors, Families, Geographic factors, Health insurance, Immigrants, Low income groups, Parents, Poverty, Racial factors, Statistical data, Trends

Toggle Details

Lorenzo SB. 2013. Health and health care for all: Resources for families (2nd. ed.). Washington, DC: Maternal and Child Health Library, Georgetown University,

Annotation: This brief presents resources for finding care, services and support and websites about health and health care for all families. Resources about the health of specific population groups are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Access to health care, American Indians, Barriers, Bibliographies, Blacks, Cultural barriers, Electronic publications, Ethnic factors, Families, Health care disparities, Health status disparities, Hispanic Americans, Hotlines, Minority groups, Racial factors, Women

Toggle Details

Isaacs J. 2013. Unemployment from a child's perspective. Washington, DC: First Focus and Urban Institute, 20 pp.

Annotation: This brief, which is part of a series of issue briefs examining he impact of the recession on children, examines unemployment from a child's perspective. It addresses the following questions: How many children are affected by parental unemployment? How does parental job loss affect children? Who are the children of the unemployed? Where do the children of the unemployed live? To what extent are families with children covered by unemployment insurance? The brief also reviews policies affecting the safety net for children of the unemployed.

Contact: First Focus, 1110 Vermont Avenue, N.W., Suite 900, Washington, DC 20005, Telephone: (202) 657-0670 Fax: (202) 657-0671 E-mail: http://www.firstfocus.net/about/contact-us Web Site: http://www.firstfocus.net Available from the web site.

Keywords: Academic achievement, Adolescent attitudes, Child attitudes, Child development, Child health, Children, Ethnic factors, Families, Geographic factors, Health insurance, Low income groups, Parents, Poverty, Programs, Public policy, Racial factors, Statistical data, Unemployment

Toggle Details

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health . 2013. Health snapshot: Hispanic adolescents in the United States. [Rockville, MD]: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health , (E-updates)

Annotation: This website provides information about Hispanic adolescents in the United States related to health care coverage, adolescent pregnancy, educational attainment, mental health, substance abuse, and weight. For each topic, links to information and programs are included. Background information about this population is also included.

Contact: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Adolescent Health , 1101 Wootton Parkway, Suite 700, Rockville, MD 20852, Telephone: (240) 453-2846 E-mail: oah.gov@hhs.gov Web Site: http://www.hhs.gov/ash/oah Available from the web site.

Keywords: Access to health care, Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent pregnancy, Adolescents, Cultural factors, Educational attainment, Mental health, Ethnic factors, Health insurance, Hispanic Americans, Obesity, Programs, Substance abuse

Toggle Details

Minnesota Department of Health. 2013. Infant mortality in Minnesota: A summary of statistics, activities, and past work group recommendations-Region V Infant Mortality Summit. [St. Paul, MN]: Minnesota Department of Health, 35 pp.

Annotation: This report describes a summit in March 2013 to address the infant mortality problem in Minnesota, particularly racial and ethnic disparities in infant mortality, and to lay a foundation for the development of a comprehensive plan by the Minnesota Department of Health and its partners to further reduce infant mortality. Section 1 provides an overview of infant mortality in Minnesota by putting into context the significant racial and ethnic infant mortality disparities that exist in the state. Sections 2 and 3 highlight infant mortality rates by selected infant and maternal characteristics. Section 4 addresses selected maternal behaviors linked to infant mortality such as smoking and alcohol consumption.

Contact: U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, Parklawn Building, Room 18-05, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Telephone: (301) 443-2170 Secondary Telephone: (800) 311-BABY (311-2229) Web Site: http://www.mchb.hrsa.gov Available from the web site.

Keywords: Alcohol use during pregnancy, Drug use during pregnancy, Ethnic factors, Infant death, Infant mortality, Minnesota, Prenatal influences, Racial factors, Risk factors, State initiatives

Toggle Details

Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (SACIM). 2013. Report of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (SACIM): Recommendations for Department of Health and Human Services action and framework for a national strategy. [Rockville, MD]: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality (SACIM), 74 pp.

Annotation: This report provides a plan to reduce infant mortality in the United States. The report includes an outline of strategic directions and recommendations, background on the problem of infant mortality in the United States, principles for a national strategy, and details related to six strategic directions for reducing infant mortality. Also discussed is information on services to improve women's health, birth outcomes, infant health, and infant survival; opportunities to decrease infant mortality through implementation of the Affordable Care Act; a crosswalk between an action plan to reduce racial and ethnic health disparities and recommendations to reduce infant mortality; and specific actions to increase breastfeeding.

Contact: Secretary's Advisory Committee on Infant Mortality, U.S. Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Parklawn Building, 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857, Web Site: http://www.hrsa.gov/advisorycommittees/mchbadvisory/InfantMortality/index.html Available from the website.

Keywords: Breastfeeding, Ethnic factors, Federal initiatives, Health care reform, Infant health, Infant mortality, National programs, Postpartum care, Pregnancy, Prenatal care, Prevention services, Program development, Racial factors, Statistical data, Strategic plans, Women's health

Toggle Details

Child Trends Data Bank. 2013. Steroid use: Indicators on children and youth (upd.). [Bethesda, MD]: Child Trends Data Bank, 12 pp.

Annotation: This report provides information about anabolic steroid use among students in grades 8, 10, and 12. The report discusses the importance of the issue (including health problems and behavior problems related to steroid use in adolescents); trends; differences by gender, race, and HIspanic origin, and college plans; state and local estimates; international estimates; and national goals.

Contact: Child Trends, 7315 Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 1200 W, Bethesda, MD 20814, Telephone: (240) 223-9200 E-mail: Web Site: http://www.childtrends.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Adolescent attitudes, Adolescent behavior, Adolescent health, Athletes, Eduational factors, Ethnic factors, Mental health problems, Racial factors, Risk taking, Sex factors, Statistical data, Steroids, Substance abuse, Trends

Toggle Details

Prevent Blindness America, National Center for Children's Vision and Eye Health, Transitions Optical Healthy Sight for Life Fund. 2013. Focus on children's eye health in culturally diverse populations. Chicago, IL: Prevent Blindness America, 7 pp.

Annotation: This fact sheet highlights children's eye-related issues including factors that further impact members of various ethnic groups. Topics include the difference between vision screening and eye examinations; risk factors; eyewear solutions; eye health among ethnic groups (African Americans, Asian Americans, Hispanics, and Whites); signs of vision problems in children; healthy eye tips for children; and where to find eye care. Tips for parents and recommendations for primary care health professionals are included. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Prevent Blindness America, 211 West Wacker Drive, Suite 1700, Chicago, IL 60606, Telephone: (800) 331-2020 Web Site: http://www.preventblindness.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Children, Consumer education materials, Ethnic groups, Eye care, Eye diseases, Health promotion, Minority groups, Primary care, Risk factors, Screening

   |   

 

Page 1 of 37

 Jump to Page » Next Page »

Return to Previous Page | Go To Cross-Database Search | Advanced MCHLine® Search