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Items in this list may be obtained from the sources cited. Contact information reflects the most current data about the source that has been provided to the MCH Library.

Search For: Keyword: Stress

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Displaying records 1 through 10 of 121 found.
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Parents Helping Parents (PHP) The Family Resource Center. n.d.. The modern art of caring for families. Santa Clara, CA: Parents Helping Parents (PHP) The Family Resource Center, ca. 100 pp.

Annotation: These resource materials, which are usable for handouts or overhead transparencies, are based on a workshop for nurses who work with families of children with special health needs. Sections of the notebook include the following materials: class exercises; family perspectives focusing on feelings about having a child with disabilities; principles of family centered care; guidelines for referrals; descriptions of community resources; an overview of family centered care; journal articles; eligibility criteria and procedures for referrals; and an article by the cofounder of Parents Helping Parents (PHP) that summarizes all aspects of needed professional knowledge. A brochure in the notebook describes the PHP program and provides contact information. The workshop and materials are cosponsored with Kaiser Permanente. [Funded in part by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Parents Helping Parents, 3041 Olcott Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054-3222, Telephone: (408) 727-5775 Fax: (408) 727-0182 E-mail: nancye@php.com Web Site: http://www.php.com Price unknown.

Keywords: Children with developmental disabilities, Children with special health care needs, Communication, Cultural competence, Family resource centers, Family support services, Health occupations, Parent support services, Professional training, Resource materials, Stress management

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Wells J. n.d.. Promotion of Healthy Behaviors [Final report]. South Bend, IN: Saint Joseph's Medical Center, 20 pp.

Annotation: The objective of this study was to determine whether parents who participated in and completed the parent education program exhibited a decrease in stress, an increase in problem solving and had a stronger parent-child relationship. The project was aimed at parents or caregivers of children under 3 years of age who are of low-income and of varying cultural backgrounds. Three primary methods were used to meet the outcome objectives: group sessions (Approaches to Parenting), newsletter (approaches Bulletin) and seminars. Three measures given at pre-test, short-term post-test, and long-term post-test were used for evaluation. In summary, mothers who participated in the intervention were significantly less stressful, had higher self-esteem, and were less overprotective and rejecting of their children. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov/Index.aspx Document Number: NTIS PB93-196855.

Keywords: Caregivers, Health Promotion, Low income groups, Minorities, Parent Education, Parent-Child Interaction, Parents, Stress

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Keller A. n.d.. Services for Adults with Cystic Fibrosis [Final report]. Harrisburg, PA: Pennsylvania Department of Health, 37 pp.

Annotation: This project addressed the issue of transitioning of late adolescents and young adults with cystic fibrosis from pediatric care to the adult health care system. The project was developed in order to study the issue of transitioning in terms of the health care delivery system. The goal of the project was to develop an appropriate adult health care delivery model and to study this process and the process of transitioning patients from a pediatric hospital to an adult hospital in separate locations. The objectives of the project were to examine four issues: (1) The effect of the transition on patients and families; (2) determining what services are needed in the adult care setting to provide appropriate care; (3) determining whether interinstitutional issues can be overcome to successfully develop such a program; and (4) studying the financial impact on patients and institutions of this transition. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: National Technical Information Service, 5301 Shawnee Road, Alexandria, VA 22312, Telephone: (703) 605-6050 Secondary Telephone: (888) 584-8332 E-mail: customerservice@ntis.gov Web Site: http://www.ntis.gov/Index.aspx Document Number: NTIS PB93-198372.

Keywords: Adolescents, Chronically Ill, Compliance, Cystic Fibrosis, Data Collection, Stress, Youth in Transition

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Lorenzo SB, Pickett OK. 2013-. Maternal distress in the perinatal period and child outcomes: Knowledge path. Washington, DC: Maternal and Child Health Library, Georgetown University,

Annotation: This knowledge path is a guide to resources about sources of stress that pregnant women and new mothers experience and the impact of maternal distress on the developing fetus and young child. Topics include policies, programs, and practices that enhance a woman's ability to cope with stress, provide social and emotional support for pregnant women and new mothers, and build protective factors in new families. The knowledge path is aimed at health professionals, program administrators, policymakers, and researchers. A separate brief lists resources for families. The knowledge path is updated periodically. [Funded by the O'Neill Foundation]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Child health, Electronic publications, Families, Knowledge paths, Mental health, Parenting, Postpartum care, Pregnant women, Social support, Stress, Stress management: Infant health, Young children

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Lorenzo SB. 2013. Stress during and after pregnancy: Resources for families. Washington, DC: Maternal and Child Health Library, Georgetown University, multiple items.

Annotation: This brief provides information to help families find care, services, and support and websites about stress and how to manage it during and after pregnancy. [Funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau]

Contact: Maternal and Child Health Library at Georgetown University, Box 571272, Washington, DC 20057-1272, Telephone: (202) 784-9770 Fax: (202) 784-9777 E-mail: mchgroup@georgetown.edu Web Site: http://www.mchlibrary.org Available from the web site.

Keywords: Bibliographies, Consumer education materials, Families, Pregnant women, Stress, Women's health

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Mulrooney K, Williams DS. 2012. Increasing understanding of infants and young children in military families through focused research. Los Angeles, CA: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 7 pp. (CIR policy brief)

Annotation: This brief describes what is understood about the effects of multiple or prolonged combat deployments on military families, particularly the experiences and outcomes of school-aged children's health and well-being. Contents include sections on the exceptional nature of the very young child, understanding potential risks for child maltreatment, a review of the Research and Resilience Initiative, and recommendations for conducting future research on young children in military families.

Contact: University of Southern California School of Social Work, Center for Innovation and Research on Veterans and Military Families, 1149 South Hill Street, Suite H-1114, Los Angeles, CA 90015, Telephone: (213) 821-3600 Fax: (213) 821-3601 E-mail: cir@usc.edu Web Site: http://cir.usc.edu Available from the website.

Keywords: Child abuse, Families, Maltreated children, Military, Research, School age children, Stress, Young children

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National Center on Family Homelessness. 2012. Developing a trauma-informed approach to serving young homeless families. Needham, MA: National Center on Family Homelessness, 11 pp.

Annotation: This brief outlines the core principles of trauma-informed care and outlines steps that organizations can take to adopt a trauma-informed approach to improve services to families that are experiencing homelessness. The brief discusses the core principles of trauma-informed care and provides five detailed steps to becoming trauma informed.

Contact: National Center on Family Homelessness, 200 Reservior Street, Suite 200, Needham, MA 02494, Telephone: (617) 964-3834 Fax: (617) 244-1758 E-mail: info@familyhomelessness.org Web Site: http://www.familyhomelessness.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Adolescent parents, Emotional trauma, Families, High risk groups, Homeless persons, Homelessness, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Programs, Single parents, Social services, Stress, Trauma, Young children, Young children

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National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition. 2012. Acute stress disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder and postpartum depression in parents of NICU babies. Alexandria, VA: National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, (Maternal and child health webinar series: Webinar 10)

Annotation: This webinar, hosted by the National Premature Infant Health Coalition in May 2012, presents the symptoms of acute stress disorders (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and postpartum depression (PPD) and examines research on the potentially dangerous relationship between high levels of emotional distress in new parents and impaired infant development. The webinar's featured speaker, Dr. Michael Hynan, also discusses model programs in neonatal intensive care units (NICU) and potential interventions that include screening mothers and fathers for emotional distress; offering psychosocial programs in the NICU; teaching developmental care and parenting competencies; and facilitating parent support groups led by veteran NICU parents and psychologists.

Contact: National Premature Infant Health Coalition, National Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, 4401 Ford Avenue, Suite 300, Alexandria, VA 22302, Telephone: (703) 838-7505 E-mail: agoodman@hmhb.org Web Site: http://www.npihc.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Audiovisual materials, Infant development, Intervention, Mental health, Neonatal intensive care units, Postpartum depression, Posttraumatic stress disorder

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Olson S; Institute of Medicine, Committee on From Neurons to Neighborhoods: Anniversary Workshop and National Research Council. 2012. From neurons to neighborhoods: An update—Workshop summary. Washington, DC: National Academies Press, 55 pp.

Annotation: This document presents a summary of a workshop held by the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council on October 27–28, 2010, in Washington DC, to review and commemorate a decade of advances related to the mission of the report, From Neurons to Neighborhoods: The Science of Early Childhood Development, released on October 3, 2000. It discusses research and policy issues.

Contact: National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, N.W., Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001, Telephone: (202) 334-3313 Secondary Telephone: (888) 624-8373 Fax: (202) 334-2451 E-mail: customer_service@nap.edu Web Site: http://www.nap.edu Available at no charge from the website after registration; $33 plus shipping and handling. Document Number: ISBN 978-0-309-20978-6.

Keywords: Child health, Communities, Early childhood development, Families, Health, Learning, Mental health, Neighborhoods, Parent child relations, Public policy, Relationships, Research, Stress, Young children

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Aizer A, Stroud L, Buka S. 2012. Maternal stress and child outcomes: Evidence from siblings. Cambridge, MA: National Bureau of Economic Research, 35 pp. (NBER working paper series no. 18422)

Annotation: This paper estimates the impact of in-utero exposure to stress on the human capital accumulation (years of schooling) of adult offspring using a unique dataset with detailed information on parental characteristics, including prenatal levels of the hormone cortisol (a marker for stress) and offspring outcomes. The authors also explore how prenatal stress interacts with maternal human capital. The paper provides background information on the relationship between stress, cortisol, prenatal conditions, and offspring outcomes; describes the empirical strategy and data, and presents empirical results.

Contact: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1050 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138-5398, Telephone: (617) 868-3900 Fax: (617) 868-2742 E-mail: info@nber.org Web Site: http://www.nber.org Available from the website.

Keywords: Educational attainment, Fetal development, Hormones, Low income groups, Mothers, Parents, Poverty, Pregnancy, Research, Statistical data, Stress

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